Mexico captures suspected drug lord wanted in United States

MEXICO CITY Sun Feb 9, 2014 4:49pm EST

Related Topics

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's federal police on Sunday said they arrested suspected drug boss Tirso Martinez Sanchez, who has been wanted in the United States and Mexico for allegedly running an operation that smuggled tons of cocaine across the border and into the United States and Europe.

The U.S. State Department has been offering a $5 million reward for information that could lead to the capture of Martinez Sanchez, believed to be the leader of a group that brought 76 tons of cocaine into the United States between 2000 and 2003.

Mexico's Interior Ministry said in a statement that the arrest was the result of intelligence work by the country's federal police. It said that not one shot was fired during the operation.

Police believe Martinez Sanchez worked with other drug lords in Mexico as well as in Colombia, the statement said.

(Reporting by Elinor Comlay; Editing by Leslie Adler)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (1)
P.Avina wrote:
Where I live, we’ve dealt with the effects of the cheap ass drugs being sold, consumed, etc., and I never saw a gram of coke in the barrio. But 76 tons of cocaine smuggled into the US sounds like a lot. Does the United States need tons of the stuff?. I think maryhuana is just a staged little scandal, compared to the physical amount of 300 tons of cocaine in the US at any moment. Six boxcars, ten Kenworths, three Euclids, one B52…or one kilo catapult, and it all hits the intended target.

Feb 09, 2014 6:28pm EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.