Canada's women to face Swedes for gold

SOCHI, Russia Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:18am EST

1 of 3. Canada's lead Dawn McEwen, skip Jennifer Jones, Jill Officer and vice Kaitlyn Lawes (L-R) celebrate after winning their women's curling semifinal game against Britain at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics in the Ice Cube Curling Center in Sochi February 19, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Jim Young

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SOCHI, Russia (Reuters) - Canada's Jennifer Jones kept her nerve on Wednesday to send her unbeaten team into the women's Olympic curling final where they will face holders Sweden in a repeat of the 2010 gold medal clash.

In her first Olympics, Canadian skip Jones sealed a 6-4 win over Britain with the final stone of the match. It was a just reward for the Canadians who had the contest under control after taking a 3-0 lead following the first two ends.

"I have all the confidence in the world in Jen making those shots for the win," said Canada's Kaitlyn Lawes. "She nailed it yet again."

Sweden, seeking a third successive gold, survived a scare to edge Switzerland 7-5 in the other semifinal.

Switzerland led 5-4 with eight of the 10 ends completed and could have stolen victory with the last stone but skip Mirjam Ott agonizingly failed to take the chance.

"The only thing we could do was just sit there and hope that the rock was heavy, and it was," said Sweden's Maria Wennerstroem.

Canada are the first women's team to make it through an Olympic round robin without a loss and will be confident of taking revenge on the Swedes in Thursday's final.

British skip Eve Muirhead, who had kept her team in contention with an accurate last stone. said she was "gutted" by the defeat.

"We got off on the back foot with two points (against) in the first end, but I knew that playing Canada would never be easy," she said.

Britain will play for bronze against the Swiss on Thursday.

"We will just take a little bit of time tonight to get over it and make sure we are emotionally ready for the next game, as we don't want to leave the Games empty-handed," said Britain's Anna Sloan.

(Writing by Keith Weir, editing by Robert Woodward)

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