Some victims in California tribal office shooting were relatives

Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:29pm EST

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(Reuters) - A woman who opened fire at an eviction hearing at a Native American tribal office in a California killed her brother, niece and nephew plus a fourth person, officials said on Friday, one day after the attack.

Cherie Rhoades, 44, has been arrested but not charged in the attack and is expected to be arraigned in court in Alturas on Tuesday, said a spokeswoman for the Modoc County District Attorney's Office.

Rhoades is accused of using two semi-automatic handguns to fatally shoot her 50-year-old brother, 19-year-old niece and 30-year-old nephew in Alturas, about 30 miles south of the Oregon border, said Alturas City Clerk Cary Baker, an acting spokeswoman for the small town of about 2,800 residents.

Rhoades was originally held at the local jail but moved for her protection because the fourth victim was the 47-year-old wife of an employee who works at the jail, Baker said.

Two other people at the hearing were critically wounded and remained hospitalized, officials said. One of those people was alert and talking on Friday, they said.

The names of the victims have not been released.

Rhoades had once been a tribal leader with the Cedarville Rancheria tribe, Baker said.

She lived on tribal property in Cedarville, about 20 miles east of Alturas, and was being evicted from that house along with her son, Baker said. The tribal office in Alturas is where day-to-day business is conducted for the Cedarville Rancheria.

After apparently running out bullets, Rhoades picked up a large kitchen knife and chased one person she had already shot, police said. She was detained outside the building where she opened fire, they said.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Comments (1)
FRPSR wrote:
The heroic stories of people defending life and limb from the evil which would injure or deprive the lives of innocents , seems to lag behind the “brave” motivated murderers .
Where are all the heroic weapons wielding avatars ? We are told the inflexible reading of the second amendment provides for an intractable link to the soul of our people against the implacable foes of rhyme and reason .
Perhaps the folks made of sterner stuff than those who see misfortune , and obligation , at every turn under every bed , and rock , are needed . Folks who think that emotions are difficult to handle over a lifetime . Having , it seems , finger tip control over the lives of others is not reason , but unreason .
How one observes the cowardice of killing unprepared , unarmed people , is entirely up to the individual . However we as a people owe it to ourselves to prepare ourselves against the understandable and predictable loss of control from individuals that we see daily . It is of course absurd as well as impossible to be prepared for every molecule of malignancy , but it is possible to cope with human nature . One improvement would be to refuse to romanticise the individual efforts of chance , and ally ourselves to cooperative efforts that work against known , observable weaknesses .

Feb 22, 2014 7:19am EST  --  Report as abuse
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