U.S. says reviewing relationship with Uganda government

WASHINGTON Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:36pm EST

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States said on Monday it is reviewing its relationship with Uganda's government, including U.S. assistance programs that are heavily focused on fighting HIV/AIDS, after its president signed a law imposing harsh penalties for homosexuality.

"Now that this law has been enacted, we are beginning an internal review of our relationship with the Government of Uganda to ensure that all dimensions of our engagement, including assistance programs, uphold our anti-discrimination policies and principles and reflect our values," U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in a statement.

(Reporting by Lesley Wroughton; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

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Comments (5)
Nikos_Retsos wrote:
This is the first time in history that the U.S. vowed to review its diplomatic status with a friendly country in a matter of different views over homosexuality! No wonder why all Muslim countries and other countries with strong traditional cultures consider the U.S. social values decadent! There is, however, a middle path, described by the late award winning Chicago Tribune columnist Mike Royco. He told gay straight in the face: “The way you reach a sexual climax in your bedroom is a private matter, not a matter that accords you with any special civil, political or human right. I fully agreed then with Mike Royco, and I fully agree with president Mouseveni today. Sure, gays don’t have to stay in the closet, but calling bigot any citizen who refuses to stand on a sidewalk and give “gay parades” a standing ovation is bigotry on their part -not homophobia by straights citizens.

The problem modest citizens have with gays is this: “They publicly advertise their sexual preference as a virtue: “I am proud to be gay!” There is no virtue on gayness, and the thousands of sexual abuses by gay priests on children across the continents confirms that. Then, there is the lack of sensibility by gays against normal humans. Example: “Do I want to see two gays kissing at the next to me table at a restaurant while I have dinner with my family ?” Of course not! Why not gays wait and do their kissing in private later , or sit in a corner and do it discreetly? Showing respect for the sensibility of others in public places is what civilization is all about!

Uganda’s gay law is one of many in dozens of other states, and the best law for the protection of children across the globe. Ugandan president Yueri Mouseveni’s blunt response to Obama’s finger-pointing is also virtuous. Thank you, Mr. Mouseveni; that makes two of us! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

Feb 24, 2014 4:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Nikos_Retsos wrote:
This is the first time in history that the U.S. vowed to review its diplomatic status with a friendly country in a matter of different views over homosexuality! No wonder why all Muslim countries and other countries with strong traditional cultures consider the U.S. social values decadent! There is, however, a middle path, described by the late award winning Chicago Tribune columnist Mike Royco. He told gay straight in the face: “The way you reach a sexual climax in your bedroom is a private matter, not a matter that accords you with any special civil, political or human right. I fully agreed then with Mike Royco, and I fully agree with president Mouseveni today. Sure, gays don’t have to stay in the closet, but calling bigot any citizen who refuses to stand on a sidewalk and give “gay parades” a standing ovation is bigotry on their part -not homophobia by straights citizens.

The problem modest citizens have with gays is this: “They publicly advertise their sexual preference as a virtue: “I am proud to be gay!” There is no virtue on gayness, and the thousands of sexual abuses by gay priests on children across the continents confirms that. Then, there is the lack of sensibility by gays against normal humans. Example: “Do I want to see two gays kissing at the next to me table at a restaurant while I have dinner with my family ?” Of course not! Why not gays wait and do their kissing in private later , or sit in a corner and do it discreetly? Showing respect for the sensibility of others in public places is what civilization is all about!

Uganda’s gay law is one of many in dozens of other states, and the best law for the protection of children across the globe. Ugandan president Yueri Mouseveni’s blunt response to Obama’s finger-pointing is also virtuous. Thank you, Mr. Mouseveni; that makes two of us! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

Feb 24, 2014 4:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Nikos_Retsos wrote:
This is the first time in history that the U.S. vowed to review its diplomatic status with a friendly country in a matter of different views over homosexuality! No wonder why all Muslim countries and other countries with strong traditional cultures consider the U.S. social values decadent! There is, however, a middle path, described by the late award winning Chicago Tribune columnist Mike Royco. He told gay straight in the face: “The way you reach a sexual climax in your bedroom is a private matter, not a matter that accords you with any special civil, political or human right. I fully agreed then with Mike Royco, and I fully agree with president Mouseveni today. Sure, gays don’t have to stay in the closet, but calling bigot any citizen who refuses to stand on a sidewalk and give “gay parades” a standing ovation is bigotry on their part -not homophobia by straights citizens.

The problem modest citizens have with gays is this: “They publicly advertise their sexual preference as a virtue: “I am proud to be gay!” There is no virtue on gayness, and the thousands of sexual abuses by gay priests on children across the continents confirms that. Then, there is the lack of sensibility by gays against normal humans. Example: “Do I want to see two gays kissing at the next to me table at a restaurant while I have dinner with my family ?” Of course not! Why not gays wait and do their kissing in private later , or sit in a corner and do it discreetly? Showing respect for the sensibility of others in public places is what civilization is all about!

Uganda’s gay law is one of many in dozens of other states, and the best law for the protection of children across the globe. Ugandan president Yueri Mouseveni’s blunt response to Obama’s finger-pointing is also virtuous. Thank you, Mr. Mouseveni; that makes two of us! Nikos Retsos, retired professor

Feb 24, 2014 4:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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