HMCS Toronto Completes Successful One-Year Mission Abroad

Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:32am EST

* Reuters is not responsible for the content in this press release.

HMCS Toronto Completes Successful One-Year Mission Abroad

HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA--(Marketwired - Feb. 27, 2014) - Department of National Defence/ Royal Canadian Navy

The crew of Her Majesty's Canadian Ship Toronto arrived home in Halifax on Thursday, February 27, reuniting with family and friends after more than seven months deployed in the Arabian Sea.

Quick Facts

  • This represents one of the longest naval deployments of a single hull in recent history. HMCS Toronto spent 375 days away from home and 279 days at sea, travelling close to 80 000 nautical miles (more than 146 000 kilometres) over the span of the deployment. This is the equivalent to just over 3.5 times around the world.
  • HMCS Toronto departed Halifax on January 14, 2013, arriving in the Arabian Sea region on February 3, 2013, to begin its mission on Operation ARTEMIS. Although HMCS Toronto was maintained in operations in the Arabian Sea region for over one year, the entire crew rotated out in late July 2013. The second crew completed the mission on February 2, 2014.
  • In total, HMCS Toronto successfully intercepted and destroyed nine narcotics shipments, totalling approximately 8.5 metric tonnes.
  • HMCS Toronto's CH-124 Sea King helicopter logged over 800 flying hours, and the unmanned aerial vehicle detachment logged over 1200 operational hours.
  • HMCS Toronto also conducted 16 port visits designed to reinforce relations with strategic partners, and demonstrate that Canada is actively involved in setting the conditions for security and stability in the Arabian Sea region. 

Quotes

"After more than a year away from home, and traveling over 80 000 nautical miles during this successful mission, HMCS Toronto returns as an excellent example of Canada's unwavering commitment to international maritime security. Toronto and its crew have made a massive impact on the fight against transnational criminal activity in this volatile region."
-The Honourable Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence

"HMCS Toronto has completed an outstanding maritime security mission far from home and to the highest traditions of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ship's company and embarked helicopter air detachment achieved excellence in operations in all regards, highlighting their unity as a fighting force and ability to overcome serious obstacles and unforeseen circumstances. We are all very proud of our colleagues on HMCS Toronto: they have earned a brief repose from the busy tempo of military duty and have learned many lessons to share with our training system, support bases and maintenance facilities."

- Rear-Admiral John Newton, Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic

"During our mission on Operation ARTEMIS, the crew of HMCS Toronto worked tirelessly to deny the use of the maritime environment to terrorist organizations and to demonstrate solidarity with our many international partners and allies in the region. I couldn't be more proud of their efforts and dedication given the many achievements of this crew over the past seven months. Yet we also continue to mourn the loss of our shipmate Lieutenant (Navy) Andrew Webster, and his family who remain in our thoughts and hearts."

- Commander Matt Bowen, Commanding Officer HMCS Toronto

Related Products

http://www.combatcamera.forces.gc.ca/site/gallery-eng.asp?value=OPARTEMIS

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/operations-abroad-current/op-artemis.page?

Associated Links

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/operations-supporting-docs/ctf-150.page

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/about-org-structure/canadian-joint-operations-command.page

#OpArtemis on Twitter

http://www.navy-marine.forces.gc.ca/en/index.page

For more information on the Royal Canadian Navy please visit www.navy-marine.forces.gc.ca or follow us @RCN_MRC, and @RCN_MARLANT

Maritime Forces Atlantic Public Affairs
902-427-3766
+marlantpublicaffairs@forces.gc.ca.
After Hours: 902-452-5280 or hfx.dutypao@forces.gc.ca

Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.