Australia shares seen hauled down by miners

Tue Mar 11, 2014 5:46pm EDT

MELBOURNE, March 12 (Reuters) - Australian shares are set to
open lower on Wednesday under pressure from mining stocks,
including heavyweights BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto, sliding on
worries about cooler Chinese demand for copper, coal and iron
ore.
    
    * Share price index futures fell 0.5 percent to
5,390.0, a 23.8-point discount to the underlying S&P/ASX 200
index. The benchmark inched up 2.3 points to 5,413.8 on
Tuesday.
    * New Zealand's benchmark NZX 50 index slipped 0.1
percent to 5,094.7 in early trade.
    * U.S. stocks fell on Tuesday, with selling picking up late
in the session, as investors cashed in some of the recent market
gains, but the S&P 500 finished less than 1 percent away from a
record high set last week.
    * Copper tumbled to its lowest levels in more than three
years as investors and speculators intensified selling on
worries about Chinese demand and liquidation of inventories used
for finance deals. 
    

----------------------MARKET SNAPSHOT @ 2106 GMT ------------
                    INSTRUMENT   LAST       PCT CHG   NET CHG
S&P 500                   1867.63     -0.51%    -9.540
USD/JPY                   102.96      -0.04%    -0.040
10-YR US TSY YLD     2.7716          --    -0.012
SPOT GOLD                 1348.49      0.74%     9.950
US CRUDE                  99.46       -1.64%    -1.660
DOW JONES                 16351.25    -0.41%    -67.43
ASIA ADRS                141.93      -0.92%     -1.32
-------------------------------------------------------------   
                                                        

        
  * Profit-taking drags Wall Street lower                   
  * U.S. oil falls to $100 on China bond concern           
  * Gold rises on concern over Ukraine, Chinese growth    
  * Copper tumbles to 44-month low, more losses expected 
    
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 (Editing by Mark Heinrich)