GSK's asthma drug succeeds in two late-stage trials

Wed Mar 12, 2014 3:27pm EDT

The GlaxoSmithKline building is pictured in Hounslow, west London June 18, 2013. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

The GlaxoSmithKline building is pictured in Hounslow, west London June 18, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Luke MacGregor

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(Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline Plc said its non-inhaled treatment for a type of severe asthma met the main goals in two late-stage studies.

In one study, the treatment, mepolizumab, showed statistically significant reduction in the frequency of exacerbations in patients of severe eosinophilic asthma compared with a placebo, GSK said on Wednesday.

The second study showed that patients on mepolizumab achieved greater reduction in their oral corticosteroid dose compared with those on placebo, while maintaining asthma control.

The company said the drug was administered to patients intravenously or through subcutaneous injections every four weeks in the first study.

In the second trial, the drug was administered through subcutaneous injections.

The company said it would file for regulatory approval for the drug globally by the end of the year.

GSK's shares closed 1.5 percent lower at 1670.5 pence on Wednesday on the London Stock Exchange.

(Reporting by Tasim Zahid in Bangalore; Editing by Kirti Pandey)

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