U.S. Senate Intelligence Republican says many questions on CIA issue

WASHINGTON Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:13pm EDT

U.S. Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) (L), vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Senator Jeffrey Chiesa (R-NJ) depart after a full-Senate briefing by Director of the National Security Agency General Keith Alexander (not pictured), at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, June 13, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) (L), vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Senator Jeffrey Chiesa (R-NJ) depart after a full-Senate briefing by Director of the National Security Agency General Keith Alexander (not pictured), at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, June 13, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The top Republican on the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee said on Wednesday there were still many unanswered questions about allegations that the CIA spied on the panel, and suggested a special investigator might be needed on the issue.

"Although people speak as though we know all the pertinent facts about this matter, the truth is, we don't," Georgia Senator Saxby Chambliss said in remarks on the Senate floor.

"Both parties have made allegations against one another and even speculated as to each other's actions, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions that must be addressed," Chambliss said.

He spoke a day after the Democratic chairwoman of the committee, California Senator Dianne Feinstein, made a floor speech accusing the CIA of searching computers used by committee staffers researching operations including the use of harsh interrogation methods such as simulated drowning or waterboarding.

Chambliss said no forensics had been run on CIA computers or the Senate computers involved, and that it was too soon for him to make recommendations.

"It may even call for some special investigator to be named to review the entire factual situation," he said.

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Sandra Maler and Peter Cooney)

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Comments (4)
AlkalineState wrote:
A country run by corporations and spies….. and he’s got some questions. Good one.

Where have these ‘outraged’ politicians been for the past 50 years. When the FBI was building a 23,000 page surveillance file and tapping phones without a warrant…… on MLK? Or exerting federal resources to infiltrate labor unions. COINTELPRO has been going on for decades, unchecked.

This new-found religion of indignation among the politicians is laughable.

Mar 13, 2014 1:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sabrefencer wrote:
I hate to say this, as I wish there weren’t any forms of torture…but I think, the usa and maybe a few countires in the EU, are the only ones, that confine themselves to this nai

ve thing, that we hold ourselves to some form of higher standing in war…No one else in the world does this…I think, any and all means must be used on our enemies, to shorten the war , as lightening fast as possible…..Any delay to this objective, prolongs the war and increases our dead and wounded….we have become the british in our reveolutionary war….marching so honorably, while the colonialists shot at them from behind trees….now, we march so honorably, as our enemy crashes airplanes into totally civilian areas, hides in civilian areas and plots the demise of all non muslims in the world…so screw these one sided rules, that prevent us from saving so many thousands of lives.

Mar 13, 2014 5:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Broken1 wrote:
Chambliss is full of it. The CIA told the Intelligence Committee they had searched the computers. Why would you need forensics to prove something the CIA has admitted to?

Mar 13, 2014 10:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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