Barclays cuts share awards to top bosses by 20 percent

DUBLIN Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:32am EDT

A man passes automated teller machines at a Barclays bank branch in London August 30, 2012. REUTERS/Neil Hall

A man passes automated teller machines at a Barclays bank branch in London August 30, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Neil Hall

DUBLIN (Reuters) - Barclays (BARC.L) has given its top dozen executives nearly 32 million pounds in share awards, 20 percent lower than a year ago, partly due to a drop in its stock price.

The British bank has faced a wave of shareholder criticism over its decision to raise bonuses last year despite a fall in profits and is under pressure to cut costs at its investment bank, which is the subject of a third strategic review in as many years.

Skip McGee, head of Barclays Americas, was awarded nearly 9 million pounds worth of shares under bonus plans from prior years, the bank said on Tuesday, the highest payout among Barclay's top managers but far less than the 17 million pounds awarded to Rich Ricci, Barclay's former investment bank chief, last year.

Ricci left the bank a month after cashing in his stock award. He had been a lightning rod for criticism over "fat cat" bankers and his departure was part of chief executive Antony Jenkins' bid to overhaul the culture of the bank.

Eric Bommensath and Tom King, who were appointed as co-chief executives of corporate and investment banking when Ricci departed, shared an award of over 12 million pounds with the bulk, or 8.6 billion pounds, going to Bommensath.

The fall in the amounts awarded largely reflects the 25 percent drop in Barclays' share price. Bommensath and King would have shared an award close to 17 million pounds had the share price not fallen by a quarter.

Jenkins, who has waived his bonus as chief executive for two years running, received an award valued at 3.8 million pounds under previous, deferred compensation plans. He received 1.64 million shares, down from last year when he received 1.8 million shares.

(Reporting by Carmel Crimmins; Editing by Stephen Powell)

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