China demands explanation from U.S. on Huawei spying report

BEIJING Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:38am EDT

An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski

An illustration picture shows the logo of the U.S. National Security Agency on the display of an iPhone in Berlin, June 7, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Pawel Kopczynski

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BEIJING (Reuters) - China wants a clear explanation from Washington over a report that the U.S. National Security Agency infiltrated servers at the headquarters of telecoms giant Huawei Technologies Co., a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said on Monday.

Hong Lei, the spokesman, said China was "extremely concerned" about the spying allegations.

"Recently, the international media has put out a lot of reports about the eavesdropping, surveillance and stealing of secrets by the United States of other countries, including China," he told a regular briefing.

"China has already lodged many complaints with the United States about this. We demand that the United States makes a clear explanation and stop such acts."

The New York Times and German magazine Der Spiegel on Saturday reported on classified documents, provided by former agency contractor Edward Snowden, that detailed the spying operation.

Der Spiegel also reported that the NSA was targeting China's political leadership, including former President Hu Jintao, as well as the trade and foreign ministries.

Questions over cyber-espionage have cast a shadow over China-U.S. ties, with each side accusing the other of spying.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard, Writing by Megha Rajagopalan; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

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Comments (8)
SonyJim wrote:
What exactly is there to explain? It is quite simple. The US are highly deceptive and extremely dangerous by nature. To the US establishment; China is just a vast country full of brown skins to be exploited. Don’t take it personal as America has always stolen from brown coloured people.

We all know the USA is active in corporate and government espionage. They have a lot of practice and are very good at doing it. The USA work directly with their technology companies such as Cisco, RSA, IBM, Microsoft, and service providers EDS, CSC etc to steal trade secrets from competing nations and feed that information to their multinationals to gain a competitive advantage.

Since the US commands a monopoly in the IT&T space they are not keen to see any high-tech alternatives ever succeed. They will undermine the technology used by companies like Huawei and US media will publish unsubstantiated claims aimed at sabotaging their reputation in world markets. Usually some so called expert such as Michael Hayden will be wheeled out to offer his “credible” opinion – but no one ever seems to disclose that Michael Hayden also receives money from Motorola (a competitor to Huawei). Such is the amateurish veneer of credibility the US offers up these days… Who doesn’t see through it?

The way I see it, it’s considered good sport to leak trade secrets from US companies to any other nation. Heck, I do it for free. I don’t care who the alternative is I just hand it over anonymously and feel good about myself. It can be as simple as commercial price lists, supply chain info, marketing campaigns, customer databases etc… or maybe password logins, or maybe embarrassing info. Naturally if you are deep enough its great to drop some trade secret siuch as R&D data that will have maximum cost damage. Nice!

Mar 24, 2014 7:58am EDT  --  Report as abuse
locomo wrote:
I’m sure the NSA had knowledge that China had two employees on flight MH370 that had ties to Huawei, the China–based company with military connections.

Mar 24, 2014 9:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
remi7519 wrote:
@SonyJim you are absolutely right!

Mar 24, 2014 9:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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