Malta legalizes gay partnerships and adoption

VALLETTA Mon Apr 14, 2014 6:40pm EDT

1 of 6. Gay rights activists jeer at opposition members of parliament, who abstained during a vote to recognise same-sex partnerships, in Valletta April 14, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Darrin Zammit Lupi

VALLETTA (Reuters) - The Maltese parliament approved a law late on Monday to recognise same-sex partnerships on a legal par with marriage, including allowing gay couples to adopt.

The law was greeted by wild celebrations by some 1,000 people in a square just outside parliament in Valletta, the capital of the predominantly Roman Catholic Mediterranean island where divorce was only legalized two years ago.

Labor Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, elected one year ago, said: "Malta is now more liberal and more European and it has given equality to all its people."

The opposition Nationalist Party abstained from the vote, saying it was in favor of civil unions but had reservations about gay adoptions.

Opposition leader Simon Busuttil quoted a survey which found that 80 percent of the people were against adoptions by gay couples.

"Malta has not been prepared for such a step" he said.

(Reporting by Chris Scicluna; Editing by Robin Pomeroy) nL6N0N64G5

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Comments (1)
IamMaltese wrote:
Bye Simon Busuttil, your party is again on the wrong side of history as you have always been with regards to social issues. you were against the welfare state and against divorce… the party of gloom and doom!

Apr 15, 2014 3:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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