U.S. senator warns of disenchanted voters in New Hampshire

MANCHESTER, New Hampshire Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:45pm EDT

Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is interviewed by a Reuters reporter at Sanders' office in Burlington, Vermont November 28, 2006. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is interviewed by a Reuters reporter at Sanders' office in Burlington, Vermont November 28, 2006.

Credit: Reuters/Brian Snyder

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MANCHESTER, New Hampshire (Reuters) - Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders warned that a growing number of Americans were losing faith in the political system at a New Hampshire site that often hosts presidential primary debates. But he said he is "many, many months" away from deciding on a White House run.

Liberal independent Sanders, 72, covered a raft of issues in an hour-long speech before taking questions from an audience of about 220 people at Saint Anselm College's New Hampshire Institute of Politics in Manchester, New Hampshire.

"What exists all over America today is that millions and millions and millions of people - working people, low income people, young people - they look at the political process and they say, 'Not for me,'" Sanders said in a speech that touched on the widening wealth and income gap in the United States, national security, health care and climate change.

"There are a lot of angry people out there."

Earlier in the week, Sanders told his hometown Burlington Free Press newspaper that if he were to run for president in 2016, it would be important to perform well in the neighboring New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation nominating primary.

On Saturday he said he still had "plenty of time" to make up his mind on whether to run.

"We're giving thought about it, but we've got many, many months," he said in an interview.

Sanders would face an uphill battle were he to seek the Democratic nomination or run as an independent. Polls show former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who has not yet said whether she will run in 2016, as the undisputed front-runner with about five times the support of Vice President Joe Biden, her closest potential challenger.

High school history teacher Branden Grant, 27, said he drove 100 miles from Pomfret, Connecticut, to hear Sanders speak.

"He's very authentic and sticks to his word and fights the good fight," Grant said. "I like what Bernie says."

But Richard Polonsky, 68, of Bedford, New Hampshire, said he doubted Sanders would have a shot at the White House.

"I would be surprised if he would have a chance of winning, even though I think he should," Polonsky said. "It's a tough road at this point."

Even Sanders had more immediate goals, urging voters to support Democratic candidates in the 2014 Congressional election, to help the party he is most closely allied with hold its 55-43 majority in the upper chamber.

"The first thing we have to do is make sure the Republicans do not gain control over the Senate," said Sanders, who is not up for re-election this year. "I'll be working very hard on it."

(Editing by Scott Malone and Gunna Dickson)

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Comments (1)
morbas wrote:
Democracy NC and NC NAACP movements appear to have alignment with your achievements and goals. As a second avenue, grooming perspectives may also be a direction towards democratic betterment.

Gerrymander Antidote:
World Democracies have used partial proportioned electoral systems to minimize gerrymandering. Simply, the percentage of ballots cast for a party restricts the number of seats it may occupy. An unintended consequence is the individual perspective balloting loses traceability, this is unacceptable to the American voter. The following system maintains traceability by involving the balloted elective in the dispersion/sequester of ballots for seat allotment. Since any elected Representative is entrusted by our direct ballot, that person is entrusted to re-allocate ballots per that balloted persons determination. Thus bartering from and to other perspective Representative candidates to achieve a seat or in exchanged of ballots for political favor. In these two ways the minority gains representation. This represents a positive ‘for something’ rather than negative ‘preventive against’ voting strategy.
Implementation:
The People vote for any one statewide legislative Representative candidate in the same manner as in voting for two State wide Senate seats. For single seats simple majority applies. Else for multiple seats, and after the balloting period, each perspective Representative candidate tallies his/her vote: if equal to or larger than the minimum he/she fills one of the seats. Federal Congressional House Representative multiple seat minimum equals total ballots cast divided by number of allotted seats to be filled. If a ballot tally is less than the minimum he/she can politically compromise for the necessary additional ballots with other candidates having insufficient or excess free ballots to re-allocate. After a set barter period time, free ballots are re-allotted by the then State governor.

I would argue that this would benefit local level selection of leadership benefiting democratic compromise. The timid may want to implement ‘ward’ level evaluation test bed of this gerrymander antidote. The next generation political representatives would naturally carry the process into state and federal levels.

Thank You for your attention,
God Speed with your next endeavors
Michael Shaver, pin name morbas(i)

Apr 14, 2014 8:00am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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