Target names new CIO to oversee technology, security

Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:27am EDT

The sign outside the Target store is seen in Arvada, Colorado January 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The sign outside the Target store is seen in Arvada, Colorado January 10, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Rick Wilking

(Reuters) - Target Corp (TGT.N), which is recovering from a massive data breach, on Tuesday named high-profile information technology consultant Bob DeRodes as chief information officer.

The discount retailer's previous CIO resigned in March, several months after the data breach, which included the theft of about 40 million credit and debit card records and 70 million other records of customer details late last year.

DeRodes starts on May 5. Target, the third-largest U.S. retailer, said it was still looking for a chief information security officer and a chief compliance officer.

DeRodes has been a senior information technology advisor for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Secretary of Defense, and the U.S. Department of Justice.

He sits on the board of NCR Corp (NCR.N) and was a director at privately held Veracode, which offers cloud-based application security. He worked at First Data Corp from 2008 to 2010 and at Home Depot Inc (HD.N) from 2002 to 2008.

Target also said that starting early next year, all of its store-branded credit and debit cards will be equipped MasterCard Inc Inc's chip-and-PIN (personal identification number) technology.

(This version of the story has been filed to correct in 5th paragraph to show that DeRodes is no longer on Veracode board)

(Reporting by Phil Wahba in New York; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn)

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