Pratt & Whitney says 'minor anomaly' during flight test; no fire

TORONTO, April 30 Wed Apr 30, 2014 11:48am EDT

TORONTO, April 30 (Reuters) - Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp, said it shut down a test engine after a "minor anomaly" during flight testing near Montreal on Tuesday, but said media reports of a fire were inaccurate.

"The engine was shut down as a precaution," the company said in a statement about the test flight from its Mirabel Aerospace Centre.

"Examination of the engine revealed that there was no apparent damage, and we expect to run it again in the next day or two. Minor anomalies such as this are common in flight test. Early reports in the media of a fire on the engine were inaccurate."

The company said that for proprietary reasons it would not identify which engine was being tested.

Bombardier Inc said the incident did not involve the PW1524 model of Pratt & Whitney's new geared turbofan motor that will power its all-new CSeries jetliner.

"That incident has no impact on our flight test program," Bombardier Aerospace spokeswoman Marianella de la Barrera said. "It's our understanding that the incident relates to another variant of the main family of the engine."

Bombardier, which is to report first-quarter financial results on Thursday, is "very pleased" with the performance of the PW1524 engine in CSeries testing, de la Barrera said. The engine, certified in February 2013, is in operation on three CSeries flight test vehicles.

Last summer, Pratt & Whitney redesigned a component of its geared turbofan engine being developed for Airbus's top-selling A320neo aircraft after tests revealed "distress" in the PW1100G engine's hot core. (Editing by Leslie Adler)

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