Swiss court grants $4.5 billion divorce to Russian tycoon's wife

GENEVA Mon May 19, 2014 5:36pm EDT

Dmitri Rybolovlev of Russia, President of AS Monaco Football Club, attends the French Ligue 2 soccer match between Monaco and Caen at Louis II stadium in Monaco May 4, 2013.   REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

Dmitri Rybolovlev of Russia, President of AS Monaco Football Club, attends the French Ligue 2 soccer match between Monaco and Caen at Louis II stadium in Monaco May 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Eric Gaillard

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GENEVA (Reuters) - The wife of Russian tycoon Dmitry Rybolovlev has won a $4.5 billion divorce settlement in a Geneva court, Swiss media reported on Monday.

After a six-year divorce battle, Elena Rybolovleva won 4.0 billion Swiss francs and custody of the couple's 13-year-old daughter, although her estranged husband can still appeal the ruling.

She began divorce proceedings in Switzerland in 2008, winning a freeze on some of her husband's assets including majority ownership in French soccer club AS Monaco, a $295 million stake in Bank of Cyprus, and a $95 million Palm Beach, Florida home purchased from Donald Trump.

She later sued him in the United States, accusing him of trying to shield the Florida property from the divorce proceedings, along with an $88 million Manhattan penthouse bought from former Citigroup Inc Chief Executive Sanford "Sandy" Weill and his wife, Joan.

She also said her husband had used marital property to buy a multitude of other assets through a variety of trusts and limited liability companies, hoping to put those assets beyond her reach.

Last year their elder daughter Ekaterina bought the Greek resort island of Skorpios, where shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis married Jacqueline Kennedy in the 1960s. Ekaterina bought the island from Onassis' sole surviving descendant, his 28-year-old granddaughter Athina Onassis Roussel.

Rybolovlev, who is resident in Monaco, made much of his fortune from the 2010 sale of his stake in fertilizer company Uralkali [UFLL.UL] for $6.5 billion.

(Reporting by Tom Miles; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Comments (2)
AlkalineState wrote:
Well if you don’t like being out-smarted by your trophy wives and their lawyers… quit acquiring trophy wives. No one made you do it. I think this ruling is great.

May 20, 2014 12:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
conradfist wrote:
@AlkalineState yeah, that’s what he gets for oppressing her with that lavish country mansion and all those fancy cars, I guess?

May 20, 2014 10:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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