PRESS DIGEST- New York Times business news - June 11

June 11 Wed Jun 11, 2014 2:29am EDT

June 11 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories on the New York Times business pages. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* Microsoft is challenging the authority of federal prosecutors to force the giant technology company to hand over a customer's email stored in a data center in Ireland. (r.reuters.com/ruk99v)

* Talks between Bank of America and Justice Department stalled on Monday after the bank's latest offer - more than $12 billion to resolve state and federal investigations into its sale of mortgage investments that later imploded - fell far short of prosecutors' demands, according to people briefed on the matter. (r.reuters.com/nuk99v)

* A decision by the Food and Drug Administration to question the use of wooden planks to age some cheeses has produced a stink that rivals Limburger, prompting an uproar among artisanal cheese makers and consumers who fear they might lose access to products like obscure blue cheeses from Vermont and imported Parmigiano-Reggiano. (r.reuters.com/wuk99v)

* Amazon customers who want to order forthcoming Warner Home Video features, including "The Lego Movie," "300: Rise of an Empire," "Winter's Tale" and "Transcendence," are finding it impossible to do so. The retailer's page for the movies says that customers' only option is to sign up to be notified when they become available. (r.reuters.com/xuk99v)

* Google agreed on Tuesday to buy Skybox Imaging, a provider of high-quality satellite images, for $500 million, as the technology giant continues to work on fulfilling its lofty ambitions for its Internet offerings. (r.reuters.com/zuk99v)

* General Motors chief executive, Mary Barra, told shareholders on Tuesday that the company was making major changes in its operations in the wake of an internal investigation of its recall of defective small cars. (r.reuters.com/byk99v)

* The American International Group on Tuesday named a successor to Robert Benmosche, the insurer's chief executive and the voluble leader who oversaw its recovery from the financial crisis. A.I.G. said that its board had picked Peter Hancock, the head of its property casualty business, who will take over as chief executive on Sept 1. He will also become a director. (r.reuters.com/cyk99v)

* Target named Brad Maiorino, formerly in charge of global information security at General Motors, as its new chief information security officer on Tuesday, on the eve of its annual shareholders' meeting, as the retailer sought to bolster its data defenses and calm investor chagrin after the extensive hacking it experienced last year. (r.reuters.com/dyk99v)

* Visiting a middle school in Oakland earlier this year, Tom Wheeler, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, got a glimpse of just how badly American schools need better high-speed Internet connections. Wheeler is planning next week to offer his fellow commissioners a proposed regulatory change to promote Wi-Fi in schools. Wheeler's aim is to get the issue on the agenda for the FCC's July 11 meeting. (r.reuters.com/fyk99v)

* The complex system of music licensing came under attack in a congressional hearing on Tuesday, as entertainment and media executives pleaded for changes to how music rights were acquired and paid for online and by radio and television stations. The hearing, before a House Judiciary subcommittee, was part of a broad review of copyright led by Robert Goodlatte, a Republican from Virginia who heads the Judiciary committee. (r.reuters.com/jyk99v)

* A group of eight current and former employees of United Parcel Service in Kentucky have sued the company, claiming they faced racial discrimination, poor treatment based on race and retaliation after they complained. The men also contend that an effigy of a black UPS employee hung from the ceiling outside a manager's office for four days. (r.reuters.com/kyk99v) (Compiled by Ankush Sharma in Bangalore)