PRESS DIGEST-New York Times business news - June 13

June 13 Fri Jun 13, 2014 1:18am EDT

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June 13 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories on the New York Times business pages. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* Amid fierce pushback from the financial services industry, the Labor Department, which oversees retirement plans, recently delayed releasing a revised proposal that would require a broader group of professionals to put their clients' interest ahead of their own when dealing with their retirement accounts. The department said it would release the proposed rule in January, according to its regulatory agenda, instead of this August. (r.reuters.com/vuw99v)

* Facebook said on Thursday that it was going to give its users the ability to see the dossiers of likes and interests it keeps on them, as well as the ability to change, add or delete information in those files. (r.reuters.com/fyw99v)

* Ford Motor Company said on Thursday that it would reduce the mileage rating on six new models, most of them hybrids, and pay $125 to $1,050 to customers who own or lease about 200,000 of the cars in the United States. The announcement came during increasing federal scrutiny of automakers over safety and fuel-economy standards. (r.reuters.com/hyw99v)

* The Senate on Thursday brought the Federal Reserve Board a little closer to full strength, confirming Lael Brainard, a former Treasury Department official, to one of the three open seats by a vote of 61 to 31. The Senate also confirmed Stanley Fischer as the Fed's vice chairman by a vote of 63 to 24 and Jerome Powell, a current member of the seven-person board, was confirmed to a new term by a vote of 67 to 24. (r.reuters.com/kyw99v)

* A federal judge in New Orleans has ordered a new trial for former BP engineer Kurt Mix, convicted of deleting text messages relevant to an investigation of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill, concluding that outside information influenced the jury's verdict. (r.reuters.com/myw99v)

* The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously allowed a false advertising suit against a Coca-Cola juice blend to move forward, saying the company's practices "allegedly mislead and trick consumers, all to the injury of competitors." The blend, sold under Coca-Cola's Minute Maid brand, is made almost entirely from apple and grape juice. But it is labeled Pomegranate Blueberry, followed in smaller type by the phrase "Flavored Blend of 5 Juices". (r.reuters.com/nyw99v)

* Twitter's chief operating officer, Ali Rowghani, resigned on Thursday, after months of watching his responsibilities shrink. The social networking company said in a securities filing that it did not intend to appoint anyone else to the position. (r.reuters.com/qyw99v)

* An appeals court on Thursday upheld an antitrust fine of 1.06 billion euros ($1.44 billion) against the computer chip giant Intel, giving more teeth to the European Union's power to hold multinational technology giants accountable. In its ruling, the General Court said the penalty was proportionate to the company's anticompetitive behavior. It is the largest antitrust penalty that the authorities in Brussels have levied on a single company. (r.reuters.com/tyw99v)

* Eric Schneiderman, New York's top prosecutor, is backing a new bill in the state legislature aimed at regulating the use of so-called payroll cards, whose fees, critics say, can severely cut into the paychecks of low-wage workers. The new proposal would require employers to offer other payment options and consumer protections. (r.reuters.com/bax99v)

* The Department of Agriculture announced $31.5 million for a program to combat a plant disease that threatens Florida's $9 billion citrus industry and has driven up the cost of orange juice. (r.reuters.com/dax99v) ($1 = 0.7345 Euros) (Compiled by Ankush Sharma in Bangalore)

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