Speculative net shorts in U.S. 10-year T-note futures rise -CFTC

Fri Jun 13, 2014 3:35pm EDT

June 13 (Reuters) - Speculators' net bearish bets on U.S.
10-year Treasury note futures rose for a second week, according
to Commodity Futures Trading Commission data released on Friday.
    The amount of speculators' bearish, or short, positions in
10-year Treasury futures exceeded bullish, or long, positions by
71,903 contracts on June 10, according to the CFTC's latest
Commitments of Traders data.
    A week earlier, speculators held 43,295 net short positions
in 10-year T-note futures.
    Below is a table of the speculative positions in Treasury
futures on the Chicago Board of Trade in the latest week:
 U.S. 2-year T-notes (Contracts of $200,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long         206,613        253,965
 Short        182,329        196,135
 Net           24,284         57,830
 
U.S. 5-year T-notes (Contracts of $100,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long         316,908        323,148
 Short        288,833        279,473
 Net           28,075         43,675
 
U.S. 10-year T-notes (Contracts of $100,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long         371,971        383,136
 Short        443,874        426,431
 Net          -71,903        -43,295
 
U.S. T-bonds (Contracts of $100,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long          78,536         89,976
 Short         72,639         66,159
 Net            5,897         23,817
 
U.S. Ultra T-bonds (Contracts of $100,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long          46,367         54,126
 Short         39,287         37,538
 Net            7,080         16,588
 
Eurodollar (Contracts of $1,000,000) 
        10Jun2014         Prior week
        week           
 Long         887,379        804,451
 Short      2,394,843      2,433,276
 Net       -1,507,464     -1,628,825
 
 (Reporting by Richard Leong; Editing by James Dalgleish)
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