On 'Tonight Show', Chris Christie shows off dance moves, deadpans on 'Bridgegate', 2016

June 13 Fri Jun 13, 2014 4:42am EDT

June 13 (Reuters) - New Jersey Governor Chris Christie showed off his dance moves on NBC's "Tonight Show" on Thursday in a Father's Day riff that referenced the bridge lane closure scandal that has dogged him, and joked about his White House aspirations.

The Republican politician and host Jimmy Fallon, both dressed in polo shirts and pleated khakis, aped a series of dance moves a father might pull off at a wedding, such as the bend-and-yank "Lawn Mower" and "The Oh Stop! I'm Not Embarrassing You."

The "Evolution of Dad Dancing" skit was a recent take on a popular parody Fallon has done with first lady Michelle Obama.

Fallon wagged his finger in a dance move called "This Bridge Is Closed", a reference to the scandal over the September 2013 lane closures leading to the George Washington Bridge that caused huge traffic jams and were apparently orchestrated by Christie's top allies. An exasperated Christie glared at Fallon and then walked off stage.

Christie, known to be a Bruce Springsteen fan, then trotted back on stage to the New Jersey rock star's "Born to Run", which was also used in a musical parody performed by Springsteen and Fallon on the show in January about the bridge scandal.

Christie has adamantly denied any knowledge of the so-called "Bridgegate" scandal but it has proved embarrassing for him as he is seen as a potential presidential contender in 2016.

During the dance skit Christie and Fallon also did the "Dance You Do At A Springsteen Concert."

Aside from the dance routines, media reported that Fallon asked Christie, hypothetically, if he would win in a 2016 White House race against Democrat Hillary Clinton, also seen as a likely candidate.

"Hypothetically? You bet," Christie said.

"In a dance-off?" Fallon said.

"That's what I was talking about," Christie said. "What were you talking about?" (Reporting by Eric M. Johnson; Editing by Susan Fenton)

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