Ukraine fighting threatens water supply to four million: OSCE

KIEV Mon Jun 16, 2014 5:45am EDT

Ukrainian servicemen stand guard at a checkpoint near the town of Amvrosievka, in Donetsk region June 5, 2014.   REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev

Ukrainian servicemen stand guard at a checkpoint near the town of Amvrosievka, in Donetsk region June 5, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Maxim Zmeyev

Related Topics

KIEV (Reuters) - Fighting in eastern Ukraine threatens water supplies to the city of Donetsk and could have serious consequences for 4 million people, monitors for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe said on Monday.

The OSCE's Special Monitoring Mission in eastern Ukraine quoted local officials as saying a water pumping station and a section of pipeline near the town of Semyonovka, close to the bitterly contested city of Slaviansk, had been damaged in fighting between government forces and separatists.

"This pumping station and pipeline constitute the main water supply for Donetsk city's population of 1 million, and a further 3 million inhabitants of the region," it said in a statement following talks with Donetsk mayor Alexander Lukyanchenko.

The OSCE mission quoted the mayor on its Facebook page as saying that the water supply to Donetsk had not been affected yet, but that this was set to change "in a very short while".

Repair work was under way but help was needed to prevent it being interrupted by shooting, it said.

Semyonovka lies about 5 km (3 miles) southeast of Slaviansk and 110 km (70 miles) north of Donetsk, the main city in the Donbass coal mining region.

The statement is the latest sign of a growing humanitarian crisis in eastern Ukraine.

Water, food and electricity supplies have been affected in some areas and thousands of people have fled their homes for safe areas, including some who have taken refuge in Russia.

The separatists rose up in the Russian-speaking east in April to press for annexation by Moscow after Ukraine's pro-Russian president was toppled in February and Russia annexed the Crimea region from Ukraine in March.

(Reporting by Timothy Heritage; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (2)
AlfNeuman wrote:
Kiev isn’t Nazi. They are just taking about building an electrified fence at the border, putting Russian speakers into ‘filtration camps’ and resettling ethnic Ukrainians in the eastern regions. But Kiev isn’t Nazi.

Jun 16, 2014 6:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
CanRus wrote:
AlfNeuman wrote:
“Kiev … are taking about building an electrified fence at the border, putting Russian speakers into ‘filtration camps’ and resettling ethnic Ukrainians in the eastern regions.”
That’s quite an incredible claim! When did the Ukrainian government announce this? I must have missed the memo…

It seems the Kremlin’s “Let’s hate Ukrainians – they’re Nazis” campaign is still going strong. It’s reasonable to assume that many Russians who only speak Russian and get bombarded with this type of nonsense every day would eventually end up believing it. But how the “people” working at Kremlin’s propaganda department could possibly hope to convince people who read Reuters and have access to tons of other information not controlled by the Russian government?… I don’t get it. Are they that stupid? Or do they just assume everyone else is?

Jun 16, 2014 7:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

Full focus