TIMELINE-Russia tightens beer market regulations

Tue Jun 17, 2014 10:18am EDT

MOSCOW, June 17 (Reuters) - The Russian government started
to tighten beer market regulation in 2010 by tripling excise
taxes, followed by restrictions on sales, advertising and
consumption, as part of a campaign to curb alcoholism.
    Here are some milestones that have changed the market
landscape: 
    
    2010
    Russia hikes beer taxes by 200 percent.     
    
    2011
    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signs a bill that
classifies beer as an alcoholic drink. Most provisions of the
law will come into effect in 2012 and 2013, extending to beer
regulations that had already been applied to stronger spirits.
    Excise taxes rise by 11 percent.
    
    2012
    Russia bans beer drinking in public places and TV, Internet,
and outdoor advertising of beer. 
    Excise taxes rise by 20 percent.    
    
    2013 
    Russia bans beer sales in kiosks and other non-stationary
places and bans beer sales elsewhere from 11 p.m. to 8 a.m.,
excluding bars, cafes and nightclubs. Regional authorities may
set their own time limits and in some regions beer sales are now
banned between 9 p.m. and 11 a.m.
    Beer advertising ban is extended to printed media.
    Excise taxes rise by 25 percent.
    Russian deputies call for an increase in the legal drinking
age to 21 from 18. A bill is submitted to the State Duma lower
house of parliament.
    Russian brewers agree to voluntarily stop selling beer in
plastic bottles of more than 2.5 litres, or 2 litres for beer
with an alcohol content above 6 percent, from 2014, amid calls
from some parliamentarians to ban beer in plastic bottles
completely.
    
    2014
    Excise taxes rise by a further 20 percent.
    The lower house of parliament takes the first step towards
limiting the size of plastic beer bottles.     

 (Reporting by Maria Kiselyova; Editing by Elizabeth Piper and
Giles Elgood)
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