Philips electronics says wins patent case against Nintendo in UK

AMSTERDAM Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:39am EDT

The logo of Philips is seen at the company's entrance in Brussels September 11, 2012.  REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (

The logo of Philips is seen at the company's entrance in Brussels September 11, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Francois Lenoir (

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AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Philips Electronics NV said on Friday it had won a patent infringement cases against Nintendo in the United Kingdom, the first of four lawsuits filed against the Japanese gaming company.

Philips spokesman Bjorn Teuwsen said the patent related to motion and gesture tracking systems used in the Wii game console.

"It's about a patent for motion, gesture and pointing control that we make available to manufacturers of set-top boxes and games consoles through a licensing program," he said.

"We'd been trying to come to a licensing agreement with Nintendo since 2011, but since it didn't work out we started legal action in Germany and the UK in 2012, France in 2013 and in the U.S. last month," he added.

Philips declined to give any details about any possible financial implications from the ruling.

"We've requested fair compensation for the use of our patents," Teuwsen said.

(Reporting By Thomas Escritt and Anthony Deutsch, editing by William Hardy)

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Comments (1)
Travenous wrote:
Nintendo needs to appeal – this is despicable. Wii’s motion control has been known since 2005; how can Philips really get away with this? SOmething NEEDS to change here.

Jun 20, 2014 9:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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