China supreme court appoints top environmental judge

BEIJING, June 30 Mon Jun 30, 2014 1:03am EDT

BEIJING, June 30 (Reuters) - China's supreme court has appointed a senior judge to handle environmental cases as the environmentally challenged country bids to get tough on polluters and improve the way its laws are enforced, an official newspaper said on Monday.

China Environmental News, published by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, said Deng Xuelin had been appointed as the presiding judge of the Environmental and Resources Tribunal of the Supreme People's Court.

The tribunal was formally established just two weeks ago.

Beijing, hit by a series of pollution scares and scandals, has vowed to reverse some of the damage done by three decades of untrammelled economic growth, but it has traditionally struggled to impose its will on big industrial enterprises and the local governments that protect them.

The report said the new state tribunal would give "unified guidance and coordination" to the 134 specialist environmental courts that have been set up by local governments, noting that the procedures used to handle such cases was "very informal".

Litigators have long complained that lawsuits launched against polluters have been routinely rejected or even ignored by local courts, many of which lack the capacity and the independence to take on powerful government-backed firms.

China has promised to create legal channels allowing members of the public to take action against firms that break the law, but environmental officials say they lack resources and are already overwhelmed by the number of cases.

Earlier this year, China passed amendments to its 1989 Environmental Protection Law, giving local governments greater powers to fine, shut down and even imprison violators. (Reporting by David Stanway; Editing by Paul Tait)

Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.