Target date funds try timing the market

BOSTON, July 14 Mon Jul 14, 2014 7:00am EDT

BOSTON, July 14 (Reuters) - Mutual fund companies are trying to juice returns of target date funds by giving their managers more leeway to make tactical bets on stock and bond markets, even though this could increase the volatility and risk of the widely held retirement funds.

It's an important shift for the $651 billion sector known for its set-it-and-forget-it approach to investing. Target date funds typically adjust their mix of holdings to become more conservative over time, according to fixed schedules known as "glide paths."

The funds take their names from the year in which participating investors plan to retire, and they are often used as a default investment choice by employees who are automatically enrolled in their company 401(k) plans. Their assets have grown exponentially. (link.reuters.com/ruf42w)

The funds' goal is to reduce the risk investors take when they keep too much of their money in more volatile investments as they approach retirement, or when they follow their worst buy-high, sell-low instincts and trade too often in retirement accounts.

So a move by firms like BlackRock Inc, Fidelity Investments and others to let fund managers add their own judgment to pre-set glide paths is significant. The risk is that their bets could blow up and work against the long-term strategy - hurting workers who think their retirement accounts are locked into safe and automatic plans.

Fund sponsors say they aren't putting core strategies in danger - many only allow a shift in the asset allocation of 5 percent in one direction or another - and say they actually can reduce risk by freeing managers to make obvious calls.

"Having a little leeway to adjust gives you more tools," said Daniel Oldroyd, portfolio manager for JPMorgan Chase & Co's SmartRetirement funds, which have had tactical management since they were introduced in 2006.

GROWING TACTICAL APPROACH

BlackRock last month introduced new target date options, called Lifepath Dynamic, that allow managers to tinker with the glide path-led portfolios every six months based on market conditions.

Last summer, market leader Fidelity gave managers of its Pyramis Lifecycle strategies - used in the largest 401(k) plans - a similar ability to tweak the mix of assets they hold.

Now it is mulling making the same move in its more broadly held Fidelity target fund series, said Bruce Herring, chief investment officer of Fidelity's Global Asset Allocation division.

Legg Mason Inc says it will start selling target date portfolios for 401(k) accounts within a few months whose allocations can be shifted by roughly a percentage point in a typical month.

EARLY BETS PAYING OFF

So far, some of the early tactical target date plays have paid off. Those funds that gave their managers latitude on average beat 61 percent of their peers over five years, according to a recent study by Morningstar analyst Janet Yang. Over the same five years, funds that held their managers to strict glide paths underperformed.

But the newness of the funds means they have not been tested fully by a market downturn.

"So far it's worked, but we don't have a full market cycle," Yang cautioned.

The idea of putting human judgment into target date funds raises issues similar to the long-running debate over whether active fund managers can consistently outperform passive index products, said Brooks Herman, head of research at BrightScope, based in San Diego, which tracks retirement assets.

"It's great if you get it right, it stings when you don't. And, it's really hard to get it right year after year after year," he said. (Reporting by Ross Kerber; Editing by Linda Stern and Leslie Adler)

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