HIGHLIGHTS-Yellen's testimony to Senate Banking Committee

WASHINGTON, July 15 Tue Jul 15, 2014 10:00am EDT

WASHINGTON, July 15 (Reuters) - Following are selected highlights from the prepared testimony of Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday.

YELLEN ON POLICY OUTLOOK

"In sum, since the February Monetary Policy Report, further important progress has been made in restoring the economy to health and in strengthening the financial system. Yet too many Americans remain unemployed, inflation remains below our longer-run objective, and not all of the necessary financial reform initiatives have been completed. The Federal Reserve remains committed to employing all of its resources and tools to achieve its macroeconomic objectives and to foster a stronger and more resilient financial system."

YELLEN ON LABOR MARKET CONDITIONS

"The FOMC is committed to policies that promote maximum employment and price stability, consistent with our dual mandate from the Congress. Given the economic situation that I just described, we judge that a high degree of monetary policy accommodation remains appropriate.

Labor force participation appears weaker than one would expect based on the aging of the population and the level of unemployment. These and other indications that significant slack remains in labor markets are corroborated by the continued slow pace of growth in most measures of hourly compensation."

YELLEN ON INFLATION

"Consistent with the anticipated further recovery in the labor market, and given that longer-term inflation expectations appear to be well anchored, we expect inflation to move back toward our 2 percent objective over coming years."

YELLEN ON ECONOMIC GROWTH

"Although the decline in GDP in the first quarter led to some downgrading of our growth projections for this year, I and other FOMC participants continue to anticipate that economic activity will expand at a moderate pace over the next several years, supported by accommodative monetary policy, a waning drag from fiscal policy, the lagged effects of higher home prices and equity values, and strengthening foreign growth." (Washington ecoomics team)

Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.