GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks fall, bond prices rise after Malaysian air crash

Thu Jul 17, 2014 12:02pm EDT

* Russia assets fall as U.S., EU impose more sanctions
    * U.S. housing starts weak, but Morgan Stanley up on results
    * European shares sag after strongest day in three months

 (Adds report of plane crash, updates prices)
    By Ryan Vlastelica
    NEW YORK, July 17 (Reuters) - Stock markets around the world
on Thursday extended losses while safe-haven assets rose
following news that a Malaysian airlines jet had crashed near in
eastern Ukraine near the Russia border.
    According to a Ukrainian interior ministry adviser, almost
300 people died in the crash, caused by a missile fired at the
plane. The report follows an increase in tensions between
Ukraine and Russia that has resulted in clashes along the
border, including the targeting of aircraft. 
    "There is a safe-haven bid across the curve on these
reports," said Justin Lederer, Treasury strategist at Cantor
Fitzgerald in New York.
    Wall Street stocks fell to session lows following the report
and European shares added to their losses. Gold prices spiked,
as did U.S. Treasuries. Stocks of airline companies were hit
hard, with the NYSE Arca Airline Index dropping 1.3
percent. 
    The Dow Jones industrial average fell 56.87 points or
0.33 percent, to 17,081.33, the S&P 500 lost 10.15 points
or 0.51 percent, to 1,971.42 and the Nasdaq Composite 
dropped 29.16 points or 0.66 percent, to 4,396.81.
    The benchmark U.S. 10-year Treasury note rose
13/32 in price, yielding 2.482 percent. Gold prices 
jumped more than 1 percent in their biggest one-day advance in
about a month.
    The pan-European FTSEurofirst 300 was down 1
percent and the MSCI International ACWI Price Index
 increased losses to 0.6 percent.
    The Japanese yen rose 0.3 percent against the dollar,
while the Swiss franc was little changed and the U.S.
dollar was flat against a basket of currencies.
    U.S. crude futures rose 1.5 percent to $102.72 per
barrel.

 (Editing by Meredith Mazzilli and James Dalgleish)
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