Factbox: Airlines suspend flights to Tel Aviv on security concerns

Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:14pm EDT

(Reuters) - Airlines canceled flights into Tel Aviv on Tuesday after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and Europe's aviation regulator advised carriers not to fly to Ben Gurion International Airport following a nearby rocket strike.

The following is a rundown of carriers that have so far canceled flights to Israel:

* Delta Air Lines suspended service "until further notice" to and from Ben Gurion and its New York hub at John F. Kennedy airport. Delta Flight 468, a Boeing 747 from JFK with 273 passengers and 17 crew, diverted to Paris-Charles de Gaulle Tuesday after reports of rocket debris near the Tel Aviv airport.

* American Airlines Group canceled US Airways flights between Tel Aviv and Philadelphia.

* United Airlines suspended operations to and from Tel Aviv until further notice.

* Deutsche Lufthansa AG said it would suspend flights to Tel Aviv for 36 hours, citing security concerns. The suspension also affects its Germanwings, Austrian Airlines and Swiss divisions.

* Air Berlin halted flights on Tuesday and Wednesday.

* Air France said it was suspending all flights to Tel Aviv until further notice.

* Dutch carrier KLM halted its Amsterdam-Tel Aviv flight on Tuesday, and a spokeswoman said it would review the situation daily.

* Budget carrier Norwegian Air suspended flights to Tel Aviv until further notice, a company spokeswoman told the Norwegian news agency NTB.

* Scandinavian Airlines suspended a flight from Copenhagen due out late Tuesday, and another one from Stockholm to Tel Aviv on Wednesday, as well as the return flights for both routes, it said on its website. It added it would determine on Wednesday if other flights must be scrapped.

* Air Canada canceled its scheduled flight to Tel Aviv from Toronto scheduled for later on Tuesday.

* Britain's easyJet Plc said it was suspending its services to and from Tel Aviv for 24 hours and would not be operating flights between Luton and Tel Aviv and Basel/Tel Aviv on July 23. The low-cost airline said on its Facebook page that it would later review its operations to and from Israel on a day-by-day basis, taking into account the advice from all relevant authorities.

(Reporting by Karen Jacobs in Atlanta, Niklas Pollard in Sweden, Gwladys Fouche in Norway, Victoria Bryan in Berlin, Euan Rocha in Toronto, Ludwig Burger in Frankfurt, Thomas Escritt in Amsterdam, John Irish in Paris and Aashika Jain in Bangalore; editing by Andrew Hay and G Crosse)