Sniffer dog warning sends Australian jet passengers on a rush to flush

SYDNEY Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:27am EDT

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SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian budget airline Jetstar apologized on Wednesday after a crew member told passengers on a flight from the Gold Coast tourist strip, including some returning from a popular music festival, to flush away "anything you shouldn't have".

The warning from the flight attendant that sniffer dogs and quarantine officers were on standby in Sydney prompted a rush to the plane's toilets, News Ltd reported.

Jetstar, owned by Qantas Airways Ltd, said it discussed the matter with the crew member involved, who made the announcement over the plane's PA system.

The airline said the flight attendant had taken a routine announcement about Australia's strict quarantine regulations, which prevent some plant and fruit materials being transported between states, too far.

"Our procedures allow cabin crew to deliver the quarantine message through a public announcement and on this occasion the crew member elected to do so," Jetstar said.

"The crew member's words were poorly chosen and are plainly at odds with the professional standards we'd expect from our team," it said in an emailed statement.

The indie music festival Splendour in the Grass, the largest of its kind in Australia over winter, is held over three days near the tourist haven of Byron Bay, about an hour's drive south of the Gold Coast across the Queensland state border.

The festival attracts around 30,000 fans to Byron Bay's seaside parklands each year, with 2014's line-up featuring artists including Outkast, Lily Allen, and Interpol.

(Reporting by Thuy Ong; Editing by Jane Wardell and Paul Tait)

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Comments (1)
Hellade wrote:
What do you mean “words poorly chosen and are plainly at odds”? The flight attendant spoke, so that every one would understand. Had he/she not spoken loud and clear no one would budge. The point is MESSAGE DELIVERED and every one of the passenger is safe with no custom harassment.

Jul 30, 2014 1:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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