Lagos sees second Ebola case, doctor who treated victim: health minister

LAGOS Mon Aug 4, 2014 12:49pm EDT

Nigeria's Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu speaks during a media briefing about the status of the Ebola disease control in Nigeria at the health minister's office in Abuja July 31, 2014.  REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

Nigeria's Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu speaks during a media briefing about the status of the Ebola disease control in Nigeria at the health minister's office in Abuja July 31, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde

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LAGOS Aug 4 (Reuters) - Lagos recorded its second case of Ebola on Monday, in a doctor who treated U.S. victim Patrick Sawyer, Nigeria's health minister said.

Sawyer died in Lagos last month after arriving there by plane from Liberia.

Ebola has killed 826 people in West Africa since the outbreak began in February, mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

"As of today, one of the doctors that treated the late Mr Sawyer has tested positive for the Ebola virus," Onyebuchi Chukwu told a news conference. Of 70 people who were under surveillance, eight had been "quarantined at an isolation ward provided by the Lagos state government," he added.

Ebola is one of the world's deadliest diseases, with a mortality rate of up to 90 percent of cases. The disease starts with headaches and fever, and final-stage symptoms include external and internal bleeding, vomiting and diarrhea. There is no effective treatment and no vaccine to protect against it.

The latest outbreak began in the forests of remote eastern Guinea in February. Its arrival of one of the world's deadliest diseases in Nigeria, Africa's biggest economy and its most populous country, with 170 million people, has caused panic.

Lagos is Africa's biggest city, with 21 million people, and one of the world's most crowded, with poor healthcare infrastructure.

(Reporting by Camillus Eboh; Editing by Larry King)

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Comments (1)
Is it safe to fly the African sky? UK residents seem very concerned about the ebola exposure risk associated with air travel. Expert after expert reassured them of the very minimal as though almost non existent risk.
I have seen that 11 people who may have been exposed to ebola via Sawyer in one article, and was puzzled by another that claimed a total of 59 people may have come into contact with Sawyer.
Now this article represents a population of 70, with 8 of those now in isolation.
Do the math 11+59=70
Do media lies designed to protect us do more harm than the truth?
The truth will set you free.

Aug 04, 2014 1:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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