Colorado lawsuit alleges cannabis overdose from fairground candy

DENVER Fri Aug 8, 2014 2:10pm EDT

A fully budded marijuana plant ready for trimming is seen at the Botanacare marijuana store ahead of their grand opening on New Year's day in Northglenn, Colorado December 31, 2013.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

A fully budded marijuana plant ready for trimming is seen at the Botanacare marijuana store ahead of their grand opening on New Year's day in Northglenn, Colorado December 31, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Rick Wilking

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DENVER (Reuters) - A Colorado man overdosed on the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana after eating chocolate bars obtained from a fairground vendor promoting the drug but whose products should have been cannabis-free, court documents showed.

Colorado last year became the first U.S. state to begin the regulated sale to adults of marijuana for recreational use.

This year's County Fair in the state capital Denver included exhibitors selling marijuana-themed merchandise and other products at a "Pot Pavilion", where Jordan Coombs said he was given the confections.

In a negligence lawsuit filed in state court on Thursday, Coombs said he was hospitalized after ingesting the chocolate, which was handed out by staff at an exhibition booth for LivWell, a Denver-based marijuana retailer.

Coombs said he "projectile vomited" in his car and that emergency room physicians diagnosed him "as overdosing on THC," the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, the lawsuit said.

LivWell did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The fair said in its promotional advertising that no actual marijuana would be allowed on the grounds, the lawsuit said.

"During our event we had a very strict policy that all of our vendors agree to, banning all marijuana ... products from the fair," Denver County Fair officials said in a statement.

Colorado regulators last week proposed rules governing the potency of marijuana-laced food after two deaths possibly linked to such products made headlines.

(Reporting by Keith Coffman in Denver, Colorado; Writing by Eric M. Johnson, editing by John Stonestreet)

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Comments (4)
Trichiurus wrote:
Resend this asinine law before it really spirals out of control, and before more die from this liberal experiment and liberal concept of making things better through ignorance, stupidity, and self-indulgence.

Aug 08, 2014 9:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Juistice wrote:
I’m sure it had nothing to do with the 18 beers he quaffed beforehand?

Aug 08, 2014 8:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
saintchris wrote:
Sounds like some ER physicians have a vendetta and are using their medical authority for political reasons. I bet there was no actual testing for THC and the case will be thrown out.
Vomiting, even the projectile type, is not a very serious medical condition and the term “overdose” here is very misleading.
Don’t underestimate the smear campaigns by those who made money and held power by blaming marijuana for society’s problems. Are any of the doctors investors in rehab facilities by chance?

Aug 10, 2014 5:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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