UPDATE 2-ISDA sets Argentina CDS auction date after yen bond inclusion

Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:06pm EDT

(Adds new auction date)

By Davide Scigliuzzo and Christopher Whittall

NEW YORK/LONDON, Aug 21 (IFR) - The International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) has set an action date of September 3 to settle Argentina's credit default swaps after including two controversial yen-denominated bonds in the list of deliverable securities.

In a 14-to-1 vote, members of ISDA's determinations committee decided Thursday to allow the yen bonds to be delivered in the auction that will determine the payout for the US$813m net notional of CDS, rejecting a challenge that they should be left out.

A representative for Pacific Investment Management Co (PIMCO) was the only member who opposed the decision, according to a note posted on ISDA's website.

The little-traded yen notes - a 4.33% December 2033 and a 0.45% December 2038 - had been the focus of investor attention as they trade at steep discounts to par value and their inclusion into the auction will likely result in a lower payout for CDS holders.

Participants said that the market had already priced in a lower CDS payout of around 40 cents on the dollar prior to the latest ISDA announcement. This is well below the 48 cents where Argentina's euro Par bonds change hands, which were the next cheapest-to-deliver obligations.

"The impact will be large in terms of recovery value," Jane Brauer, quantitative fixed-income strategist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, said before the ISDA announcement.

"If yen bonds are included in the auction, then recovery will be on the low side. If they're not included, recovery will migrate to the euro bond price, which is a big jump."

The challenge to the inclusion of the two notes caused ISDA to postpone the CDS auction, originally scheduled for Thursday.

The auction, run by Creditex and Markit, will determine the payout protection buyers will receive as a result of the sovereign's default on July 30. (Reporting by Davide Scigliuzzo in New York and Christopher Whittall in London; Editing by Paul Kilby)

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