Hundreds march in Ferguson to protest police shooting: local media

Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:39pm EDT

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(Reuters) - Hundreds of marchers took to the streets in Ferguson, Missouri, on Saturday, local media reported, with protesters calling for justice three weeks after a white police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager.

Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot the 18-year-old Brown on Aug. 9. The shooting sparked violent protests in the St. Louis suburb and drew global attention to the state of race relations in the United States.

For days after the shooting, police and demonstrators in Ferguson clashed nightly, with authorities coming under fire for mass arrests and what critics said were the use of heavy-handed tactics and military gear.

Organizers said the march on Saturday was held to protest against police killings, brutality, profiling and cover-ups, according to their Facebook page.

Marchers began gathering in a restaurant parking lot near the location of the shooting before walking to the spot where Brown was shot, the St. Louis Post Dispatch reported.

The paper said some marchers carried signs and some wore T-shirts that showed a person with his hands raised with the words "Don't Shoot."

"I came here because I want to be a part of the spirit of the movement," Memphis resident Ian Buchanan, 44, told the newspaper.

Authorities have released few details about the shooting. A St. Louis County grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the U.S. Justice Department has opened its own investigation.

In differing accounts, police have said Brown struggled with Wilson, who shot and killed him. But some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

(Reporting by Brendan O'Brien in Milwaukee; Editing by Jonathan Kaminsky and David Gregorio)

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Comments (6)
notfooled2 wrote:
Spread a little free stuff around and things will calm down.

Aug 30, 2014 5:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Daleville wrote:
I am so tired of hearing about this!

How about some front page news of the police chief shot to death in Texas by a young Hispanic male? How about a story of the latest black child killed by a stray shot from some gang member and why there are no protests or riots about that?

Is there any further information about whether Brown is the one who strong armed the much smaller man at the convenience store?

Aug 30, 2014 5:56pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
lsismor wrote:
We have reached a point in this country where police can shoot, kill and claim self-defense with absolutely no ramifications. Brandishing their firearms without necessity has become standard procedure. Innocents are murdered every year regardless of rase, sex or circumstance.

In 2010, two Long Beach California police officers AMBUSHED and killed an unarmed white 35-year-old male, Doug Zerby, who was sitting in front of a house, waiting for a ride and playing with a hose nozzle. Without announcing their presence, they opted to shoot and ask questions later. These “professional” law enforcement officers should have been prosecuted for murder. Instead they were kept on the payroll while the City of Long Beach tried its best to keep their names from the public. This is just one of endless examples across the U.S.

Knowing they will be “shielded” by their departments has resulted in police having carte blanche to act as judge and executioner. This will never change until they are held responsible and serve time for their actions.

Aug 30, 2014 6:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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