Fast-food workers to launch intensified protests across U.S.

Mon Sep 1, 2014 11:24pm EDT

Demonstrators chant in the driveway during a protest at the McDonald's headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois, May 21, 2014.  REUTERS/Jim Young

Demonstrators chant in the driveway during a protest at the McDonald's headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois, May 21, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Jim Young

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(Reuters) - McDonald's line cooks, Burger King cashiers and other fast-food restaurant workers across the U.S. plan to walk off the job on Thursday in an ongoing battle with their employers to gain a $15 hourly wage, organizers said on Monday.

The protests, announced on Twitter by organizer Fight For 15, come as cities across the nation propose minimum wage increases while Democrats seek to raise the federal minimum wage ahead of this year's mid-term congressional elections.

Fast food workers have launched a series of protests over the last nearly two years to bring awareness to their demands, which include the right to unionize without retaliation.

In one of the last major actions, restaurant workers launched rallies in 150 cities, including Boston, Chicago, New York and Miami in May.

This time, organizers are staging walkouts in more than 100 cities and plan to use nonviolent civil disobedience tactics such as sit-ins, The New York Times reported.

Unlike the protest in May, thousands of home care workers are expected to join in solidarity, the Times reported.

(Reporting by Laila Kearney; Editing by Tom Hogue)

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Comments (19)
randysom wrote:
Local musicians don’t make $15/hr apiece when doing their gigs. Now I could see home care workers making that much, assuming they were certified care workers. But for flipping burgers. Not so much.

Sep 01, 2014 11:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
russhaney wrote:
So once again here’s what is really happening. The primary forces behind this are the union fat cats who need more members and mandatory dues to prop up their high standard of living. The liberal politicians who need more votes and more taxes to prop up their high standard of living. As for the worker sheep they are too ignorant to understand that they will at best see a $1 pay raise after the union dues and higher taxes. They will then be forced to work harder since the amount of workers will be reduced to pay for this wage hike. This level of pay will also attract people on welfare to take their jobs. All those 32 year old kids living at home with college debts will now get in line which will raise the standard for employment forcing all you whiny fools once again to the back of the line and the bottom of the economic ladder.

Sep 01, 2014 11:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jzhou wrote:
American used to be innovation, working hard, get education, moving up, have a better future, now days, government subsidy, entitlement program becoming part of American DNA, public and private university teaching young people nothing else beside “community involvement”; “volunteerism” not engineer, not math, not science. Young people and community organizers only want to get corporation donation to fund their “non profit charity work”. What do they think corporation get money in the first place? Do those evil corporations have to produce something, people willing to pay in order to survival? Those “evil corporation” have to pay tax, and donate their money to fund “Charity”? It is not whether $15 dollar per hour to flip burger can be justified; it is about American as country becoming more communism than communist China scaring me!

Sep 01, 2014 11:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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