Obesity rates reach historic highs in more U.S. states

NEW YORK Thu Sep 4, 2014 12:50pm EDT

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Rates of adult obesity increased in six U.S. states and fell in none last year, and in more states than ever - 20 - at least 30% of adults are obese, according to an analysis released on Thursday.

The conclusions were reported by the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and were based on federal government data. They suggest the problem may be worsening despite widespread publicity about the nation's obesity epidemic, from First Lady Michelle Obama and many others, plus countless programs to address it.

From 2011 to 2012, by comparison, the rate of obesity increased in only one state.

The 2013 adult obesity rate exceeds 20% in every state, while 42 have rates above 25%. For the first time two states, Mississippi and West Virginia, rose above 35%. The year before, 13 states were above 30% and 41 had rates of at least 25%.

Adult obesity rates increased last year in Alaska, Delaware, Idaho, New Jersey, Tennessee and Wyoming.

Nationally, rates of obesity remained at about one-third of the adult population, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America (stateofobesity.org), while just over two-thirds are overweight or worse.

Rates of childhood obesity have leveled off, with about one in three 2- to 19-year-olds overweight or obese in 2012, comparable to rates over the last decade.

Continuing a years-long trend, nine of the 10 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South. The West and Northeast had the healthiest BMIs, with Colorado boasting the lowest adult obesity rate, 21.3%.

Obesity also tracked demographics, with higher rates correlating with poverty, which is associated with lower availability of healthy foods and fewer safe neighborhoods where people can walk and children can play for exercise. For instance, more than 75% of African Americans are overweight or obese, compared with 67.2% of whites.

That pattern affects children, too. In 2012, just over 8% of African American children ages 2 to 19 were severely obese, with a BMI above 40, compared with 3.9% of white children. About 38% of African American children live below the poverty line, while 12% of white children do.

One-third of adults who earn less than $15,000 per year are obese, compared with one-quarter who earn at least $50,000.

"Obesity rates are unacceptably high, and the disparities in rates are profoundly troubling," said Jeffrey Levi, executive director of TFAH.

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Comments (13)
Conservation wrote:
Gender, Male / Female, statistics not mentioned. ?
Could it be that WOMEN are far ‘superior to men when it comes to size.

Sep 04, 2014 9:39am EDT  --  Report as abuse
YsoSirius wrote:
BMI is a horrible measure of obesity. You’re doing it wrong.

Sep 04, 2014 9:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
aynew1 wrote:
when are they going to admit that the food pyramid is upside-down. carbs complex or otherwise are what makes you fat.

Sep 04, 2014 10:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

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