Worm turns sheep clone to "good" fat: China scientists

Comments (15)
scythe wrote:

roundworm fat, mmmmm – more parasites with the rice, pleeez

Apr 24, 2012 5:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
CF137 wrote:

Am I suppose to picture that geno-monster on my dinner plate?

Apr 24, 2012 7:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SanPa wrote:

China has been focusing on basic research to understand nature including the miracle that is life. America has refocused attention and resources to praying for miracles.

Guess where the Nobel Laureates will be coming from 20-30 years for now. Guess who could win the race on the next Manhattan Project in couple decades. If you guessed The Vatican or the Crystal Cathedral, you would be wrong.

Apr 24, 2012 8:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TobyONottoby wrote:

“He was mighty good with mustard.”
– W. C. Fields

Apr 24, 2012 9:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
WarrensGoff wrote:

This is great news for the Chinese government. Now they can clone more sheep to toe the party line.

Apr 24, 2012 10:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Lord_Foxdrake wrote:

@scythe

Ha!

@SanPa

Scary but true.

@myself…

I still don’t like the idea of eating this genetic garbage. You are what you eat.

Apr 25, 2012 3:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mafettig wrote:

@Lord_ – I will NEVER be a quarter pounder with cheese!

Apr 25, 2012 8:03am EDT  --  Report as abuse
LeoKretz wrote:

People are being quite irrational about genetically modified organisms, although it is understandable from the point of view of psychology.

The fact is, we eat DNA (and RNA, and protein, and carbs, etc) ALL THE TIME, and it naturally gets digested into its building blocks. DNA is DNA, regardless of where it originates. Psychologically, the idea of a gene from the little worm C elegans, one might think that “worm-ness” is now somehow a part of the sheep, but that’s just not true. The worm needs its entire genome to be a worm.

Transferring one gene, or even several, from wherever to a sheep, doesn’t make it less of a sheep. The human aversion to ‘contamination’ is at play here, and that’s the understandable part. But physically, eating a transgenic animal or plant is absolutely no different than eating anything else. You consume a whole lot of bio-molecules either way.

Where protesters against GM foods have at least half a leg to stand on, scientifically, is with regard to possible ecological effects; and with possible ‘horizontal’ gene transfer (in nature, by bacteria or viruses) from a modified plant to some other plant (weed) that wasn’t intended to be modified. That’s a whole different issue. But eating GM food is no different than eating regular food. However there is a psychological hang-up with it that is understandable, even if irrational.

Apr 25, 2012 12:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
LeoKretz wrote:

People are being quite irrational about genetically modified organisms, although it is understandable from the point of view of psychology.

The fact is, we eat DNA (and RNA, and protein, and carbs, etc) ALL THE TIME, and it naturally gets digested into its building blocks. DNA is DNA, regardless of where it originates. Psychologically, the idea of a gene from the little worm C elegans, one might think that “worm-ness” is now somehow a part of the sheep, but that’s just not true. The worm needs its entire genome to be a worm.

Transferring one gene, or even several, from wherever to a sheep, doesn’t make it less of a sheep. The human aversion to ‘contamination’ is at play here, and that’s the understandable part. But physically, eating a transgenic animal or plant is absolutely no different than eating anything else. You consume a whole lot of bio-molecules either way.

Where protesters against GM foods have at least half a leg to stand on, scientifically, is with regard to possible ecological effects; and with possible ‘horizontal’ gene transfer (in nature, by bacteria or viruses) from a modified plant to some other plant (weed) that wasn’t intended to be modified. That’s a whole different issue. But eating GM food is no different than eating regular food. However there is a psychological hang-up with it that is understandable, even if irrational.

Apr 25, 2012 12:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:

Well put, Leo. You saved me the effort.

Apr 25, 2012 1:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
OogieM wrote:

Why not just eat meat from sheep and cattle raised naturally on grass with no grains added? That will get you plenty of good fat and no GMO required.

I have serious reservations about the safety of meat from animals with inserted parasite genes!

Apr 25, 2012 1:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
LeoKretz wrote:

Sorry, didn’t mean to post twice! Leo K

Apr 25, 2012 2:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gregbrew56 wrote:

Oogie: “Why not just eat meat from sheep and cattle raised naturally on grass with no grains added? That will get you plenty of good fat and no GMO required. ”

Absolutely untrue. Ruminants grazing on natural fodder in open fields full of sunshine and children’s laughter still produce “bad” saturated fats. The DNA-modified animals described in the article produce “good” unsaturated fats, only possible (quickly)through genetic engineering.

Apr 25, 2012 5:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
OogieM wrote:

Yes they do have both kinds of fats but more of the good kinds. Sorry, but there is no way I will ever eat, raise or use any GMO products. And yes that does mean I am restricted in what I eat now. I know far too much biology to trust the safety testing that is done by and for the companies that produce such organisms=. Plus we’ve already had personal experience with the disasters round-up ready crops have caused to our farm.

Apr 26, 2012 10:12am EDT  --  Report as abuse
KarenVaughan wrote:

Omega 3 fats when heated (as in cooked lamb or pasteurized milk) peroxidize or break down to be more dangerous than heated saturated fats so are more dangerous, not healthier. This genetic manipulation is based on medical fads, not millennia of evolution.

There are reasons we and as our foodstuff evolved as we did. GMO corn and soy have been shown to impair the reproductive ability of animals that eat it. Modern wheat has more lectins that cause celiac and gluten sensitivity. Peng Peng is not progress. If you want sheep with less fat, cut itr off or eat goat.

Apr 26, 2012 1:09pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.