Prosecutors seek gag order in Trayvon Martin murder case

Comments (17)
Evo1 wrote:

This is so idiotic. If this case hadn’t already been tried in the media in a way that was extremely biased in favor of the prosecution, there wouldn’t even be a case at this point. The initial decision not to prosecute would have stood, and it would all be over. It was only because of the extremely one-sided trying of this case in the media that a special prosecutor was ever even appointed. Now that the truth is finally coming out, that this prosecution is based on no actual evidence of any wrong-doing at all, and that the prosecution is simply trying to tie-up the process with legal dirty tricks, like not cooperating with discovery, they hope to keep the jury pool as it is: already contaminated with lies that support their own position, and not balanced by any truth.

Oct 19, 2012 1:42pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
V1NR0CK wrote:

What’s idiotic is that an overzealous man with a gun failed to obey a police dispatcher and confronted an unarmed minor. What’s ironic is that Trayvon Martin is the one who actually stood his ground. Unfortunately, he didn’t have the gun. This is not about race or socio-economics. If George Zimmerman didn’t have a gun, I doubt he would have had the bravado to confront Trayvon Martin. George Zimmerman was always in the position of power. He was the adult. He was armed. Claiming self defense after you antagonize a situation is ridiculous…

Oct 19, 2012 2:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bmhay1 wrote:

George Zimmerman Profiled, Purseued, Shot and killed an unarmed kid that was doing nothing wrong! TM did not beat GZ as he claims, see the evidence! LIFE FOR GEORGE ZIMMERMAN……………JUSTICE FOR TRAYVON!!!!!

Oct 19, 2012 3:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
lie_detector wrote:

LOL!! The media already passed judgment a year ago, and they declared Zimmerman guilty without any evidence whatsoever. The scumbag Martin family are practically their own reality show, LOL!

Oct 19, 2012 3:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AndrewBinga wrote:

The scum Martins and their scum lawyer hired a PR firm to taint the case a long time ago.

Oct 19, 2012 3:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

One still wonders in what reality an unarmed teenager on a snack run could ever be cause for someone with plenty of room to back away to fear for their life. Unless said fearful person has severely irrational fears. What a joke. The only people who could possibly buy into this rubbish are those already having discarded reason. Thus I can’t really see how any tainting of the jury pool can happen in either direction. You’re either a rational person or you’re not. That’s what will matter when it comes to selecting jurors.

Oct 19, 2012 3:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Milo321 wrote:

The prolonging of this case by the defense in hopes that people forget about GZ will backfire. He is already the most hated waste of white flesh in America, this will make him even more so. Don’t forget that the kid he MURDERED is not here to present HIS defense…

Oct 19, 2012 4:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

Wow, the three people already having commented here are highly irrational if they believe there can be any justification for murdering an unarmed teenager on a snack run, when the murderer could easily have backed off had they been felt threatened. Only in America is life considered so cheap that people won’t simply take an option of safe retreat when there clearly is one available, instead preferring to take a life. What kind of a culture doesn’t instil civilized values? It is all highly disturbing to a New Zealander.

Oct 19, 2012 4:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AndrewBinga wrote:

The shooting was 27 yards from GZ’s vehicle and 70 yards away from where TM was staying. According to Dee Dee, TM had just about made it back to the place he was staying. This proves that Zimmerman did not continue following him and that TM came back and jumped GZ. SELF DEFENSE.

Oct 19, 2012 4:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

You’ve a very interesting idea as to what proof means. Maybe it’s my scientific training and being brought up in a secular culture, but proof requires substantial, reasonable and logical evidence, here. Even for the lesser legal standard of proof, or at least to be beyond reasonable doubt.

Regardless I should be most interested to hear your suggestion of a motive for an unarmed teenager carrying snacks, on the way home in the dark, alone, to ‘jump’ a larger man and attack so violently and unrelentingly, that a far larger and stronger man is unable to disengage, and even to fear for his life to the point of using deadly force.

Here in New Zealand such a story would be almost unbelievable, and subject to immediate investigation by NZ police and scorn by the public, unless the teenager had a history of violence and/or serious mental disorder. Marijuana use wouldn’t count. All that goes to show is parental, cultural and societal problems, not violence or delusion.

Not to mention the firearms offences Mr Zimmerman would face here in NZ, but that’s getting off topic. Still, one strongly suspects no one would have died that night had guns not been involved.

Oct 19, 2012 4:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
stambo2001 wrote:

None of you were there, so every thing you think you know is what they call supposition. Stating you ‘know’ what happened just makes you look like a raging moron.

Oct 19, 2012 6:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@V1NR0CK

Police dispatchers have no authority. The original call is self defesne, and all of the evidence and facts supports that. Trayvon was a violent drug offender in his school who was serving his suspension for being a violent thug.

@Wizardling

Trayvon was an athletic man, not a 12 year old boy that the media showed. He had a history of violence and drug use.

Trayvon’s autopsy showed that he died of a shot to the heart and that the gun was so close, it had left gunpowder burns on his skin.

Florida Department of Law Enforcement firearms expert Amy Siewert examined Trayvon’s gray sweat shirt and gray hoodie for powder burns and wrote that she found them on both garments, prompting her to conclude that the muzzle of the gun was touching them when Zimmerman pulled the trigger.

The Volusia County Medical Examiner’s Office found just one other injury on Trayvon’s body: a small “abrasion” on one finger of his left hand. It also found THC — the active chemical in marijuana — in Trayvon’s blood and urine.

And they gave definitive word on his size: 5-feet-11, 158 pounds. Zimmerman’s family has said Zimmerman was 5-feet-8 and about 190 pounds.

Oct 19, 2012 9:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

First I’ve heard of a history of violence on the teen’s part. What specifically? The drug use still doesn’t suggest violence. Poor judgement, poor parenting, a troubled community bringing this kid up, maybe.

Regardless all Zimmerman had to do was wait for the police. That is exactly what he was encouraged to do, and what any sensible, sane person here would do in a situation with no immediate threat to person or property. Nobody had to die that night. Even if bizarrely this teen actually attacked a stranger unprovoked (which would seem very odd in of itself), that confrontation should never have happened.

Without knowing exactly what occurred, it is very easy to imagine how Trayvon may well have been provoked. A strange man following a solo teenager night would feel very threatening. Continuing with that line of thought, it is also easy to see how a teenager without the control and better sense of an adult, might react violently if they felt threatened and cornered.

My point being that there really is only one certainty we can know about that night, beyond that the various telephone recordings tell us. That is had Zimmerman been sensible and not tried to take dangerous matters into his own hands, that at the very least Trayvon would not have died at his hands. And it’s highly unlikely any death would have occurred had the police been the ones to approach the teen.

Beyond attempts to make either side out to be completely innocent (which simply don’t ring true) – the boy was obviously not coping well with life if using marijuana, and Zimmerman is a fool to have gone into a potentially dangerous situation with a deadly weapon, yet without the necessary training, evident official authority (people respond differently to visible authority figures such as police, vs private citizens – especially a strange man in the night) and plain good sense a peace officer should have – what troubles me here is how easily this could have been avoided, and how so many in the US seem to believe just because they may have the right in states like Florida to ‘stand their ground’, that they automatically should.

It’s the same confusion as with guns in the US. Because they have the right to bear arms, they seem to think they should, full stop. Surely some good sense ought to prevail over this absurd idea that just because you have a right, you should exercise it unthinkingly. Sometimes standing one’s ground or bearing a weapon might make good sense. Other times simple good sense, simply logic suggests retreat or not waving a deadly weapon around is a safer course of action for all.

Maybe if more people could just set the rampant ideology aside and exercise good sense as to whether to take certain potentially dangerous actions, the US and world at large would be a safer place. Yes Zimmerman had the right to patrol his neighbourhood armed with a deadly weapon, and to ‘stand his ground’ in certain situations in Florida. But did it make good sense to sharply increase the likelihood of a confrontation with an unknown teenager, when the police were mere minutes away, and good sense had to have told Zimmerman he as a private citizen was far less likely to be able to control any confrontation?

If only out of respect for human life, a civilized, responsible person puts aside pride, fear, anger, bravado, excitement, _whatever_ emotions they feel, and takes the safer route more likely to preserve _all_ involved human life, and guard against injury to _all_ concerned.

I don’t think any reasonable person able to set aside ideology, could say Zimmerman did that. Even if it turns out that was Zimmerman’s only mistake and his unlikely perfect story where he was 100% the victim is true, people like myself – even a white guy from another country – would feel a hell of a lot less appalled if Zimmerman and his side began with that admission. Instead it’s like ‘standing your ground’ is some kind of vital human right for them. No, sorry. The US is not the old west. Respect for human life and limb is a damn sight more important than always ‘standing your ground’ like a largely fictitious gunslinger of lore. Or it ought to be in any sane civilized society. All ‘stand your ground’ is, is a law that tries to help give civilians a legal defence for using force in certain situations where retreat might be preferred, but perhaps not always feasible. Instead it’s being treated as some kind of almost religious right by people who frankly come across as zealots. Witness some of the really rather ugly comments above, and in other forums.

Oct 19, 2012 11:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

Oh, and TheNewWorld – your post is some of the zealotry I mentioned. The only link I can find to Trayvon Martin and violence I can find is him apparently liking mixed martial arts *gasp*. Please don’t tell me that is your grounds for calling him “a violent thug”? Because if that is the case, you’re not only a zealot, you’re a sad joke. So I sincerely hope you’ve more than just grossly out of context fragments of news stories.

Oct 19, 2012 12:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Wizardling

Here is his school history. He attacked a school bus driver. The teen was suspended from school three times. He was on suspension when he was shot in February, after officials caught him with a ‘marijuana pipe’ and a baggie with drug residue. Trayvon was kicked out of school in October for graffiti after he was allegedly caught with a ‘burglary tool’ and a bag full of women’s jewelry Officials also suspended him once for skipping school and tardiness

Oct 20, 2012 1:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Wizardlying

This isn’t New Zealand. We have a culture for young teens that encourages violence, drug use, womanizing, robbery, and thug life. He was living the life as can be witnessed by his drug use and school record. His death was no tragedy, it was inevitable.

Oct 20, 2012 1:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wizardling wrote:

Even if all that’s true, and I’ve not seen mention in the news reports I’ve read, I respectfully disagree his death was inevitable. A tragedy, yes. More likely in the long run, yes. But still preventable that night, had emotion been set aside.

Which brings us back to my core point and reason for feeling appalled. Even a troubled young man’s life is far, far more important than whatever motivated Zimmerman that night. Even if everything happened exactly as Zimmerman said, he didn’t just endanger and ultimately kill another person. He put his own life at risk, and potentially those of third parties too. This man wanted to be a peace officer himself, but clearly couldn’t exercise the restraint and good sense necessary to that profession, let alone to a responsible civilian.

I respect peace officers who put the safety of the public first, with of course all possible consideration for their own safety. Too often in the US deadly force is the easy choice. It’s a shame that attitude that now seems to pervade US society, carried on down to a man the FBI describe as having a hero complex.

All life has value, and if a safer option exists for all concerned, and it’s even the easy option, why on Earth would you not take that? If Zimmerman wanted to be a hero, he did everything wrong that night. Real heroes don’t take the easy choices that put others at risk. That’s not heroic. It’s dangerous recklessness.

Oct 20, 2012 4:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.