Analysis: GM badly lags Ford in Europe restructuring

Comments (6)

well, well, well,GM struggling in europe. does that mean obama and thef democrats will need to bail them out again? and again? and again?

Nov 03, 2012 8:04am EDT  --  Report as abuse

well, well, well,GM struggling in europe. does that mean obama and thef democrats will need to bail them out again? and again? and again?

Nov 03, 2012 8:04am EDT  --  Report as abuse
cinalray wrote:

I don’t see this to be an advantage for Ford over GM. The fact is, they are just as deep in trouble as GM is today. The media is again tilting to Ford as being so wise as oppose to GM. GM has a plan along with Ford and no one knows what the outcome will be until it plays out. The bottom line is when time will tell.

Nov 03, 2012 9:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
jscott418 wrote:

Government motors is still a poorly managed company. But don’t give Ford a lot of credit. A recent review by Consumer Reports from Ford owners shows a rapid decline in initial quality with Ford vehicles. So Ford does not how to save money but cutting manufacturing corners does not make you brilliant.

Nov 03, 2012 9:40am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ollerus wrote:

To Fords’ credit, it’s Consumer Reports rapid decline is mostly due to it’s horrible ‘my touch’ system, and not the ‘build quality’ of the vehicles. I cannot for the life of me fathom why anyone would want a flat featureless surface to navigate for climate / audio controls while I’m supposed to be focusing on driving the vehicle. I’ll personally take the knobs and physical buttons of my older truck over the technical wizardry of an ‘infotainment system’ thank you very much.
GM’s woes are due mostly to the unions, and the fact that the bailout… I mean ‘structured bankruptcy’ it went through allowed the unions to keep a strangle hold on wages / benefits. Ford is not mired with such issues and therefore can proceed with rapid restructuring to stay in business.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying unions are totally a bad thing. Prior to unions yes businesses were horribly mistreating workers, and unions made sense… back then. Today unions have become the businessmen of old, they are pushy, mean and ruining the businesses to which they provide labor. GM is a prime example of this, the unions’ demands may push the business into another bankruptcy or worse. At some point you’d think they would have the conversation, of ‘what’s worse’; Lower wages / benefits or NO JOB because the company closed due to an inability to compete in the market due to high labor costs from the unions’ demands. I know at my job we’ve taken pay cuts over the past four years, and it looks like our health insurance will be dropped next year (forcing us I guess onto the new health insurance exchanges) and through it all I can say at least I still have a job to pay my bills.

Nov 03, 2012 11:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JapanViewer wrote:

It always astounds to hear the pro-labor and left-wing denouncements of labor cutting efforts, as if these companies were created first and foremost as a charity to give them jobs and security, regardless of whether they’re profitable or not. Worse yet, these same people usually morph into political parties that both slander business and also demand they be fed by those same businesses. The organizers behind these misguided cries are usually smart and understand the reality of their follies. It’s the “ordinary folk” that usually don’t get it. Oh well.

Nov 03, 2012 3:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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