Dalai Lama says expects China political reform under Xi

Comments (5)
Spacetime wrote:

Glad Mr. Dalai still keep hoping. He is one of the most persistent guys I know.

Nov 05, 2012 10:04am EST  --  Report as abuse
stambo2001 wrote:

Ah, the Dalai Lama. Nothing says detachment to worldly concerns as politics, celebrity friends, and leading people to kill themselves in protest. Life is suffering. Nothing is permanent. This little fellow may be a Lama, but a buddhist monk he has not been for a long, long time.

Nov 05, 2012 1:52pm EST  --  Report as abuse
mgunn wrote:

Unfortunately being a democracy does not guarantee peace or non-aggressive behavior at all. Just look at us: we bombed the heck out of Vietnam and Cambodia, have the largest military by far and the most militaristic and clandestine programs worldwide, and invaded and killed over 600,000 in Iraq and lie about it. The US is routinely involved in wars and the exception for us is peace. The last time the chinese were involved in a war was decades ago and even the current tensions are limited to rhetoric and maybe water canons and public protests – really incomparable to the trillions of bullets, bombs, drones, troops, missiles, and the ensuing deaths worldwide we caused.

Nov 05, 2012 2:44pm EST  --  Report as abuse
mgunn wrote:

Unfortunately being a democracy does not guarantee peace or non-aggressive behavior at all. Just look at us: we bombed the heck out of Vietnam and Cambodia, have the largest military by far and the most militaristic and clandestine programs worldwide, and invaded and killed over 600,000 in Iraq and lie about it. The US is routinely involved in wars and the exception for us is peace. The last time the chinese were involved in a war was decades ago and even the current tensions are limited to rhetoric and maybe water canons and public protests – really incomparable to the trillions of bullets, bombs, drones, troops, missiles, and the ensuing deaths worldwide we caused.

Nov 05, 2012 2:44pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DeanMJackson wrote:

“He acknowledged that economic reforms had produced benefits for China, but said the resort to force by the authorities was at odds with their aim of creating a “harmonious society”.”

Unfortunately the Dalai Lama is clueless concerning the Leninist goal of world Communism that all Communist nations exist for (or is he?), not to mention how to interpret Communist language. To a Communist, a “harmonious society” can only be achieved after the defeat of the West:

“Behind the impressive smokescreen of pseudo-democracy, pseudo-capitalism and pseudo-reform, this Russian-Chinese ‘cooperation-blackmail’ strategy is irreconcilably hostile to the West. Again, this is no mere presumption. It was explicitly confirmed in May 1994 to Clark Bowers, a member of an official US Republican delegation to Peking, by Mr Mo Xiusong, Vice Chairman of the Chinese Communist Party, who is believed to be the highest-ranking Chinese Communist official ever to have answered questions put to him by a knowledgeable Western expert on Communism:

BOWERS: Is the long-term aim of the Chinese Communist Party still world Communism?

Mo XIUSONG: Yes, of course. That is the reason we exist.” – “The Perestroika Deception” (1995), by KGB defector Major Anatoliy Golitsyn.

“Since at least the early 1970s, the Communist party of China has been poised to create a spectacular but controlled “democratization” at any appropriate time. The party had by then spent two decades consolidating its power, building a network of informants and agents that permeate every aspect of Chinese life, both in the cities and in the countryside. Government control is now so complete that it will not be seriously disturbed by free speech and democratic elections; power can now be exerted through the all-pervasive but largely invisible infrastructure of control. A transition to an apparently new system, using dialectical tactics, is now starting to occur.” — Playing the China Card (The New American, Jan. 1, 1991).

Nov 05, 2012 5:21pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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