Traffic pollution tied to autism risk: study

Comments (7)
Bradnaksuthin wrote:

Well, what do you expect when you dig up chemicals that have been buried beneath the surface of the earth for hundreds of millions of years and then burn them in the atmosphere.
Up until 250 years ago the air was probably a lot safer to breath than it is today.

Nov 26, 2012 5:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Bradnaksuthin wrote:

Well, what do you expect when you dig up chemicals that have been buried beneath the surface of the earth for hundreds of millions of years and then burn them in the atmosphere.
Up until 250 years ago the air was probably a lot safer to breath than it is today.

Nov 26, 2012 5:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Bradnaksuthin wrote:

Well, what do you expect when you dig up chemicals that have been buried beneath the surface of the earth for hundreds of millions of years and then burn them in the atmosphere.
Up until 250 years ago the air was probably a lot safer to breath than it is today.

Nov 26, 2012 5:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Gosseyn wrote:

It’s past time for 15% ethanol to be available at the gas stations instead of just 10%. The less gasoline in the blend the better for our health!

Nov 26, 2012 8:25pm EST  --  Report as abuse
metcalfe wrote:

If it’s bad in America, just imagine how bad it must be in large Asian cities like Bejing, Hong Kong, Jakarta and Bankok!

Nov 26, 2012 8:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
moxsee wrote:

The psychology of the parents that live in a commuter lifestyle should be considered in this study. Parents that live in areas with higher smog levels spend more time commuting and working than with their children. Consequently, the only way these kids can get attention is to push the boundaries until the parents respond. The symptoms you see in autistic children are directly correlated to the lack of attention parents show towards their children. Think outside the box.

Nov 26, 2012 10:17pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DTF2010 wrote:

Will be interesting to see further results from this work particularly if it analyzes time diaries of indoor vs outdoor time of both mothers and children.

While this and other research that focus on air pollution around highways from motor vehicles, Indoor air quality can be a significant source of emissions and close chemical exposures, asthma triggers etc- especially second-hand smoke. And since most time is spent indoors, those considerations are very important and should not be an afterthought.

Nov 27, 2012 11:43am EST  --  Report as abuse
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