U.S. retailers scramble after lackluster holiday sales

Comments (36)

Jobs, jobs, jobs. Until this country gets back to work, we can expect to see more of the same.

Dec 26, 2012 10:09am EST  --  Report as abuse
susette wrote:

Well, we can’t undo the recession. Maybe the GOP planned it that way to gain the upper hand AGAIN, and round and round it will go. The world’s economy is bankrupt, the bankiers are corrupt, and the fiscal cliff is the mindset of our once free nation.

Dec 26, 2012 10:21am EST  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:

susette
Still blamming conservatives for 4 years of a failed president? baaaa! Wait until obama is done in 2016 you will really have something to blame on the conservatives then. baaa!

Dec 26, 2012 11:09am EST  --  Report as abuse
SanPa wrote:

@somethingstinks — Not sure where you are, but we’re seeing worker shortages where I am, housing prices are rising fast, and freeways are once again packed at rush hour.

Dec 26, 2012 11:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

If your business relies on Christmas excess for make-or-break…. that is a weak-ass business. You are likely not solvent anyway.

Dec 26, 2012 12:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Timbuk3 wrote:

Shoppers in NY and New England were absolutely thinking about the horror in CT and those kids who perished. It definitely subdued the enthusiasm.

Dec 26, 2012 12:49pm EST  --  Report as abuse
InMotion wrote:

Since on-line sales had a large percentage jump this year, seems that would probably account for a lot of that. Plus, buyers are aware that huge sales are coming after Christmas, so they may just give cash for the recipients to spend at the sales.
@totherepublic: the obstruction of the gop has kept the economy in the tank more than the pres. has. And Obama is not a failed pres. regardless of how hard the GOP has tried to make him one.

Dec 26, 2012 1:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
InMotion wrote:

Since on-line sales had a large percentage jump this year, seems that would probably account for a lot of that. Plus, buyers are aware that huge sales are coming after Christmas, so they may just give cash for the recipients to spend at the sales.
@totherepublic: the obstruction of the gop has kept the economy in the tank more than the pres. has. And Obama is not a failed pres. regardless of how hard the GOP has tried to make him one.

Dec 26, 2012 1:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

susette
The GOP…who’s been in office for 4 years…

Dec 26, 2012 1:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

Timbuk3
Really…maybe but I think it shows how bad the economy truly is. If fact we all voted in November and this is just the start of the bad news.

Dec 26, 2012 1:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

AlkalineState & SanPa
Spin it how you want and there are some crazy spins. The best the Newtown shooing is the best…too much meaia coverage and this is the rationale you get. Consumers aren’t happy and are concerned about the economy. Same consumers who voted in November. Buyer’s remorse is coming soon…

Dec 26, 2012 1:10pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

Timbuk3
I know it is made with the best of intentions and is heart felt…but seriously get a grip…

Dec 26, 2012 1:11pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DeathSpiral01 wrote:

Counter intuition, as the old order attempts to protect the interest of bankers and creditors, is the new order. That is until innovation and technological change rule the day once more. We are amid a paradigm shift; our view of today’s situation is obfuscated by both longings and familiarity. Ostensibly we withdraw when we should tilt. We are the problem—lead, follow, or get out of the way—there is no going back.

Dec 26, 2012 1:16pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Crash, when people spend more on homes and cars, and less on Chinese junk….. that’s better for our economy. Unless you think retail goods made in China are more important than big-ticket items :)

Dec 26, 2012 1:22pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Adam_S wrote:

What’s really great about all this is that these stores and therefore the market DEPEND on increasing sales, every.single.year. I understand the impact of consumer spending on the national economy (68-70%), but this just sets up a dangerous precedent.

Dec 26, 2012 1:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

AlkalineState
Never said that you did. Any anyways what does that have to do with the price in Tea in China? Are you saying that people are not spending on crap from China for Christmas and are saving their money for big ticket items? Nice spin…time will tell..but I highly doubt it…show me where consumers are stating what you said or where the data/facts supports that. I would think that if the ecomnomy was better we would see comsumers spending more at both ends of the spectrum not just the big ticket items. And if they don’t have money to spend on crap what makes you think they money for the big ticket items?

Dec 26, 2012 1:56pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

crash writes: “show me where consumers are stating what you said or where the data/facts supports that…”

Well consumers don’t ‘state.’ They spend. Here’s the data: Home prices are up in 2012 and so are domestic vehicle sales. Some business articles on each.

http://online.wsj.com/mdc/public/page/2_3022-autosales.html

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-26/home-price-gains-accelerate-as-u-s-real-estate-market-rebounds.html

Dec 26, 2012 3:33pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

DeathSpiral01
OK you newage seer…just wait…

Dec 26, 2012 3:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

AlkalineState
The real estate market is up from years of stagnant sales. Also the article about homes is about prices up not necessary sales. Interest rates are down and sales up from previously bad years. I thinks it’s more that than any major economcy recovery having impact. Numbers are up but up from several horrible years so lets not get nuts. Same with cars. See below. My take Housing & Car sales up from serveral horrible years. No surprise. Holiday sales down…reality that the economy is struggling.

http://money.cnn.com/2012/01/17/autos/car_age/index.htm

With signs that car sales finally are picking up, Polk says it expects the graying of the U.S. fleet may slow down in the next three years. “It’s going to take the good economy several years of very high sales again, and people being willing to let go of those older vehicles that they’ve been holding onto,” according to Mark Seng, Polk’s global aftermarket practice leader.

Dec 26, 2012 4:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

AlkalineState
The real estate market is up from years of stagnant sales. Also the article about homes is about prices up not necessary sales. Interest rates are down and sales up from previously bad years. I thinks it’s more that than any major economcy recovery having impact. Numbers are up but up from several horrible years so lets not get nuts. Same with cars. See below. My take Housing & Car sales up from serveral horrible years. No surprise. Holiday sales down…reality that the economy is struggling.

http://money.cnn.com/2012/01/17/autos/car_age/index.htm

With signs that car sales finally are picking up, Polk says it expects the graying of the U.S. fleet may slow down in the next three years. “It’s going to take the good economy several years of very high sales again, and people being willing to let go of those older vehicles that they’ve been holding onto,” according to Mark Seng, Polk’s global aftermarket practice leader.

Dec 26, 2012 4:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Crash, I guess we’ll have to agree to disagree on that. You seem to trust the bad news but not the good news. Your scrutiny is only selectively applied.

I’d say the overall picture, when you look at U.S. output, home sales, vehicle sales, retail sales, etc. (that is, the U.S. economy overall) is mixed but with stronger signs of improvement than decline. No?

Dec 26, 2012 4:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

“U.S. retailers scramble after lackluster holiday sales”

They SHOULD be scrambling. They’re largely unnecessary. Why would I pay $400 for a camera at walmart that I could get online for $199 brand new. Walmart offers no better return policy or guarantee on that camera.

Brick-and-mortar retailers are going the way of travel agents and print classifieds. Too inefficient, the world moves on.

Dec 26, 2012 6:14pm EST  --  Report as abuse
kranzley wrote:

Even with a few more $$$$ in their pockets due to declining oil and gasoline prices, consumers spent less this Christmas. Now that oil is going back up, and fast, any monies that might have been put into consumer goods will be going back into gas tanks. To all those who see a rosy picture, I’d like to agree with you, but can’t. I see more problems ahead, not fewer. Regardless of what obama or congress does now or in a few months, taxes are going up for everyone. obamacare is taking care of that. There will be even less $$ available for discretionary spending. And AkalineState, I seriously doubt you can find a camera on-line for 50% of Walmart’s price. Are you making up facts to support your position?

Dec 26, 2012 6:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Kranzley, I was able to find a Canon T3 Rebel for $199 on ebay (unopened). Walmart had it listed for just over $400. Both sellers offered a 90-day money-back guarantee.

So who would you go with? I don’t need the fancy atmosphere of walmart that badly :)

Dec 26, 2012 7:37pm EST  --  Report as abuse
kranzley wrote:

AlkalineState Buying an item from eBay is not the same as buying from an on-line retailer, which is what your post implied. Just for kicks i checked the $399.00 at Walmarte’s web sit. It’s a bundle that includes more than just the camera. And the warranty is stated as

Compatibility and Warranty:
Compatible with PC or Mac
1-year limited manufacturer warranty

There was no mention of a 90-day money-back guarantee that I could find. Good luck with your eBay purchase. Just hope it didn’t fall off a truck or it’s actually a refurb. One of the caveats regarding buying from eBay or Craigslist is that if the price is too low, beware.

Regardless, the economy is limping along and any further disruption to consumer purchasing power could easily throw the US back into recession, as if we aren’t there already.

Dec 26, 2012 8:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
americanguy wrote:

Thanks Republicans, for trying deliberately to destroy our country and make people afraid to spend money because of the so called “fiscal cliff”.
Traitors.

Dec 26, 2012 8:22pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

americanguy
Spoken like a true lemming…boo hoo…they all have a hand but you only see what you want to see…

Dec 26, 2012 8:44pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Crash866 wrote:

AlkalineState
Keep drinking the kool aid…I started crying wolf in 2005 but everyone thought I was crazy…the worst is yet to come…

Dec 26, 2012 8:47pm EST  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

The economy was showing increasing signs of improvement, and Black Friday sales were encouraging… then along came (G)rover’s (O)bstructionist (P)irates determined to hold America hostage again to spare just 2% of Americans from a modest tax increase. I keep thinking that at some point, maybe even business will figure out that these people are NOT their saviors…

Dec 26, 2012 10:14pm EST  --  Report as abuse
yummy8755 wrote:

What’s to buy? iPads for the kids? Okay? Yourself? Okay Another big tv? Who do you know who doesn’t have two or three? Wise commentator here pointed out, car sales are up, real estate is better, and people are saving more. So, there is a lot of value thinking these days and a lack of exciting new temptations. Retail is probably overblown by a third anyway and actually these stories are framed incorrectly: it should be more like, “Even emerging from fiscally bleak times with global uncertainty, an overgrown retail establishment remains remarkably strong and robust.” Even when things were “bad,” retail was only down about 5%. This year the Christmas season is being painted bleakly, when in reality it is anything but bleak all considered.

Dec 27, 2012 4:40am EST  --  Report as abuse
yummy8755 wrote:

What’s to buy? iPads for the kids? Okay? Yourself? Okay Another big tv? Who do you know who doesn’t have two or three? Wise commentator here pointed out, car sales are up, real estate is better, and people are saving more. So, there is a lot of value thinking these days and a lack of exciting new temptations. Retail is probably overblown by a third anyway and actually these stories are framed incorrectly: it should be more like, “Even emerging from fiscally bleak times with global uncertainty, an overgrown retail establishment remains remarkably strong and robust.” Even when things were “bad,” retail was only down about 5%. This year the Christmas season is being painted bleakly, when in reality it is anything but bleak all considered.

Dec 27, 2012 4:40am EST  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Kranzley, you’re welcome to shop where you like. No one really cares. The article, and my post, were about the decline of brick-and-mortar retailers in general. They have higher costs. They have to hire more employees, heat the buildings, insure the buildings, equip the buildings, ship to the buildings, maintain the buildings, pay fines for their illegal workers on the janitorial night shift, etc.

Those costs have to be passed to along to the customer, and eventually that catches up with them. Online is streamline.

Dec 27, 2012 11:32am EST  --  Report as abuse
MikeBarnett wrote:

The US has been concentrating too much wealth into too few hands. The average shoppers can no longer drive the US economy. The 1% cannot spend enough in the millions of stores needed to keep America prosperous. The first comment claims that we need “jobs, jobs, jobs” but we can’t run the economy with low-paying jobs.

Dec 27, 2012 3:04pm EST  --  Report as abuse
WeAreLosingIt wrote:

The National Retail Federation that is shown in the article as “predicting” a 4.1% growth in holiday sales is a sham organization. It predicted double-digit growth for every holiday in 2012 – Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc. Complete sham operation.

Dec 28, 2012 1:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
Demitri wrote:

True, Christmas sales may be down. But on the positive side, Chr1st’s birthday was celebrated throughout the world and churches were packed to capacity. On Dec. 24/25 millions of men, women and children were spiritually uplifted as they considered the implications of G0d’s S0n coming to earth 2,000 yrs ago. “His name shall be called Je5us, for He shall save His people from their sins”. Let’s not forget the true meaning of the season – Having your sins forgiven by Jesu5 is worth far more than multi-million dollar Christmas sales!!!!!!!

Dec 29, 2012 9:44am EST  --  Report as abuse
gustafus wrote:

Nobody has any money. We shop Wal Mart instead of local businesses. We send our cash to China and Mexico by way of multinational leeches.

So the local hairdresser, book seller, clothing store is broke. Their employees are only part time. The only path left on this map is self destruction at the altar of Corporate slavery.

So what’s not to celebrate?

I will not set foot in a Wal Mart. I shop local when possible. If we don’t support a local economy we get what we deserve…. no Christmas money.

Dec 30, 2012 10:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
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