Early signs show Egypt's new constitution passing

Comments (12)
COindependent wrote:

Be careful what you wish for. The promotion of democracy as we practice it in western society, does not necessarily translate well in countries that have no background in liberty. These countries will get exactly what they vote for–theocratic dictatorships along the lines of Iran. The future does not bode well for them.

Dec 22, 2012 10:28am EST  --  Report as abuse
MPA wrote:

LOL! The article is obviously written by a Jew or opposition supporter. Frequent use of the word “Islamist”, calling the victories by the Brotherhood as “narrow”, when the only narrow vote was that of the Presidency.

Constant refusal to explain why the article refers to the constitution as “Islamist”, other than quoting others is nothing but yellow journalism.

Dec 22, 2012 11:23am EST  --  Report as abuse

For three decades, the US supported a dictator who did not attack Israel. However, he wisely pointed out to every visiting US official that solving the question of Palestine/Israel was an essential first step for the US to attain its goals in the Middle East. The US failed to prevent Israeli ethnic cleansing or “new settlements” in territory occupied by Israel in the 1967 war. UN recognition of Palestine as a non member state means that Palestine can seek redress from the World Court for Israel’s crimes against humanity.

For this article, the Muslim Brotherhood does not adhere strictly to Israeli demands that smuggling into Gaza must be controlled. That is only one area in which this Egypt will differ with some US desires for support of Israel, especially when some Israeli acts don’t deserve, and never deserved, US support. In addition, Egypt’s new government will have different views on the limits of human rights, freedoms, expressions, and laws required to protect individual “liberties.” The new Egypt will set up its own government with its own policies, and the US will need to adjust. Our recent debacles in Afghanistan and Iraq, coupled with three technology, corporate, and financial crises in the US, have drastically reduced US abilities to engage in new foreign debacles. The US must be content to watch other countries become themselves whether some US groups like their policies or not.

Dec 22, 2012 1:52pm EST  --  Report as abuse
reality-again wrote:

@alanchristopher

You wrote (quote): “The new Egypt will set up its own government with its own policies, and the US will need to adjust.”

Thanks for a good laugh!
FYI, Egypt is not just a failed state, it is altogether a failed country that can’t support its own people as far as basic needs such as housing, education and even food are concerned.
The fact is that Egypt depends on gifts from the US to feed its destitute population.
Throughout history, all governments who failed to assure food to their countries had to go, or adapt to circumstances.

BTW, calling America’s involvement in Iraq a (quote) “debacle” goes against the facts, if you compare the situation in that country prior to US intervention and regime change to the present situation, but that’s another story…

Dec 22, 2012 2:16pm EST  --  Report as abuse
IZen wrote:

quote-
COindependent wrote:
Be careful what you wish for. The promotion of democracy as we practice it in western society, does not necessarily translate well in countries that have no background in liberty.
-

for some perspective the democratic experiment known as the United States of America had a few flaws at the start too. Women had few rights and couldn’t vote. Kidnapped Africans and others were kept as slaves. While the constitution made lip service to separation of church and state the entire legal structure was formed around a Christianity based system and locally the church and government were often tightly entwined.

I would love to see things in Egypt start from a more progressive basis but if a vigilant population manages to keep things from sliding more towards a theocracy, over time the Egyptian economy as well as general well-being in the region may improve and attitudes may change about the role of religion in government.

Dec 22, 2012 2:22pm EST  --  Report as abuse
1942.bill wrote:

The Egyptians think that they have voting orregularities? They should have been in the United States in November!

Dec 22, 2012 2:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse
RandyBrass wrote:

What a tease… I saw “vice president quits, thinking Biden… and then the terrible, terrible let down…

Dec 22, 2012 3:32pm EST  --  Report as abuse
RandyBrass wrote:

What a tease… I saw “vice president quits, thinking Biden… and then the terrible, terrible let down…

Dec 22, 2012 3:32pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Doc62 wrote:

COindependent is correct:Egyptian Sharia democracy? It’s an oxymoron! The opposition is correct as Mursi will become Ahamadinejad and Egypt will become Iran.
The USA proved that church and state need to be separate entities.
“Ackmed” will slaughter the remaining Copts and moderate/liberal Muslims. They already slaughtered and exiled(1 million)Jews from Egypt by 1951.

Dec 22, 2012 3:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Doc62 wrote:

COindependent is correct:Egyptian Sharia democracy? It’s an oxymoron! The opposition is correct as Mursi will become Ahamadinejad and Egypt will become Iran.
The USA proved that church and state need to be separate entities.
“Ackmed” will slaughter the remaining Copts and moderate/liberal Muslims. They already slaughtered and exiled(1 million)Jews from Egypt by 1951.

Dec 22, 2012 3:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Correction: 5th Paragraph, 2nd line. “fincial” should be “financial”.

Dec 22, 2012 4:44pm EST  --  Report as abuse
MrMotO wrote:

I almost see it now. After the vote count, the Islamist will be on their merry way to turning Egypt into the tourist mecca it has always been. They’ll be swimming in all those Euro’s and dollars with scads of money for all.

Or, in reality, turn it into another festering barren hardliner friendly cesspool. Where poverty, corruption and ignorance rule for decades to come.

Dec 22, 2012 4:52pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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