More evidence for "obesity paradox"

Comments (7)
jrj906202 wrote:

Who cares.You know what your health is by how much pain you’re in and how well your body functions.Get enough exercise,eat mostly unprocessed food,not too much fat or sugar and you should be OK.

Jan 02, 2013 11:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
eMJayy wrote:

Sounds far too simplistic in my view. We keep using terms like ‘ideal weight’ and ‘overweight’ to create sweeping generalizations, but we ignore the fact that an individual’s fat distribution is also playing a major role in determining relative risk.

Consider this. You can have two individuals with the same BMI and both are considered ‘overweight’ based on their BMI. One has that extra body fat largely confined to areas of the body that have been shown to have lower association with the long term complications of obesity. The other has that fat piled up in more risky areas. The overall health risk to these two individuals would not be the same, despite the fact that they have the same BMI and are both overweight.

When we gain weight, we don’t really pile on the fat in exactly the same proportions. Some people are going to initially pile on the extra weight in a body distribution that is healthier than others. BMI doesn’t take this into account and neither does the term ‘overweight’. As you gain further body fat and become obese, that healthy fat distribution that you may have had as an ‘overweight’ individual goes out the window as everyone will tend to pack pounds wherever it can fit on their body.

Jan 02, 2013 12:46pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Adipofat wrote:

Purported obesity epidemic promotes the “obesity=disease” equation. Obesity is an adipose tissue expansion and aesthetically might not fit society’s “ideal” body shape but medicalizing obesity is pathologizing fat. Excess body fat can indeed pose a health. However, in some circumstances being obese is an advantage in some chronic diseases. The first think we should be doing is to define when obesity has to be treated hence shifting the focus from weight management to health promotion

Jan 02, 2013 2:48pm EST  --  Report as abuse
SuefromSault wrote:

Yep,
4 years ago I was “over weight.” Since then
I have lost 36 lbs because I cannot keep
food down and have lost muscle mass because I
cannot digest protein. My life expectancy has
clearly declined. I am sick and this has
resulted in my “normal” body mass index.

Jan 03, 2013 11:47am EST  --  Report as abuse
SuefromSault wrote:

Yep,
4 years ago I was “over weight.” Since then
I have lost 36 lbs because I cannot keep
food down and have lost muscle mass because I
cannot digest protein. My life expectancy has
clearly declined. I am sick and this has
resulted in my “normal” body mass index.

Jan 03, 2013 11:47am EST  --  Report as abuse
felidstar wrote:

It’s also important to look at how the individuals are maintaining normal weight. If they are doing it through smoking or some other drug addiction, then yes, those normal weight individuals are going to have shorter lifespans. Normal weight individuals also tend to be young, and there is still a mortality bump for young men because of various high-risk activities/lifestyles they engage in. So yes… a meth addition is a heck of a lot more dangerous to your health than a few extra cheeseburgers…

Jan 04, 2013 10:37am EST  --  Report as abuse

BMI is worthless… The real key is physical cardiovascular fitness… If you’re overweight but can run 3 miles, then you’re far healthier than a “normal person” who gets a chest pain after running 100 meters.

Jan 06, 2013 12:30am EST  --  Report as abuse
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