U.S. drone strike kills key Pakistan Taliban commander: sources

Comments (26)
ChAliGhafoor wrote:

so how US feel to kill innocent people along with taliban leader.

Jan 03, 2013 1:00am EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Chili

Give Obama another peace prize.

Jan 03, 2013 2:03am EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

473 to 889 Pakistani civilians killed by Obama. And we aaren’t even at war in Pakistan. And we wonder why terrorists target us.

Jan 03, 2013 2:14am EST  --  Report as abuse
Butch_from_PA wrote:

Ain’t no mountain high enough, ain’t no cave deep enough, ain’t no beard big enough to hide you from me.

Come Mr. Taliban, show me a gun, terrorize me a village, stone me a strong woman and I will promise you 101 virgins and send you to heaven as fast as I can.

They cannot win and are basically becoming target practice and a testing ground for the latest military toys and techniques.

The devil’s plot is at work. American children are being toughened with bloody destructive video games plots and getting callouses on their fingers while their brains are being programmed to work the future drone weaponry.

Give up your Taliban hats and you will be sending Americans home while bringing massive unemployment to the weaponry companies.

Jan 03, 2013 2:15am EST  --  Report as abuse
Invictuss wrote:

Again lol :)

Jan 03, 2013 2:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
Mandingo wrote:

The Pashtuns or Pathans are these people – 16 million of them in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

“In Lords of the Khyber (1984), Andre Singer recounted the story of a man he interviewed ‘who proudly declared that he had killed seven male members of a Mahsud family for having insulted his wife, and so far only his brother had been killed in the revenge.’”

“When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains
An’ the women come out to cut up what remains,
Jest roll to your right an’ blow our your brains.
An’ go to your Gawd like a solider.”

Rudyard Kipling, Barrack-room Ballads, 1892

Jan 03, 2013 2:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
Mandingo wrote:

The Pashtuns or Pathans are these people – 16 million of them in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

“In Lords of the Khyber (1984), Andre Singer recounted the story of a man he interviewed ‘who proudly declared that he had killed seven male members of a Mahsud family for having insulted his wife, and so far only his brother had been killed in the revenge.’”

“When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains
An’ the women come out to cut up what remains,
Jest roll to your right an’ blow our your brains.
An’ go to your Gawd like a solider.”

Rudyard Kipling, Barrack-room Ballads, 1892

Jan 03, 2013 2:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
matthewslyman wrote:

@TheNewWorld: You’re putting the cart before the horse! The terrorists were targeting and killing British people, Russians and Americans and their allies long before the British, Russians and American targeted them.
So… How does the Taliban’s score-card stack up?
• Record in government for human rights & services to the people?
• Number of foreign soldiers killed?
• Number of civilians killed?
• Number of muslims killed?
— It seems from where I’m standing that the Taliban is SO MUCH worse than the Americans by any pragmatic measure, that the Americans are fully justified in risking the lives of a comparatively small number of civilians in order to kill or incapacitate much larger numbers of bloodthirsty militants.

Jan 03, 2013 5:03am EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Matthewslyman

We can’t fight other people’s wars for them. We have lost in Afghanistan. We aren’t even in Pakistan, we are just assassinating people from unmanned drones. No one has ever won in that region. No one. I am sure the families of the innocent feela bit differently about your justifications of death from above than you do.

Jan 03, 2013 5:19am EST  --  Report as abuse
matthewslyman wrote:

@TheNewWorld:
> “We have lost in Afghanistan.”
> “No one has ever won in that region.”
— Depends on what we’re trying to do there. The British accomplished a lot there, in the days of the Empire; although they could rightly be said to have largely failed in their strategic objectives there. The Americans have done a lot there, in giving the Afghans a taste of freedom again, and in showing that the Taliban can be defeated wherever they are not being sheltered by the Pakistanis or resupplied from Pakistan. “Win”/”lose”, it depends what you’re trying to do. If the goal was to kill or capture Osama bin Laden; the Americans did it. If the goal was to give Afghanistan 10 years without the dearth of the Taliban, the Americans did it. If the goal was to install a low-corruption, representative, stable government & system of transferring power in Afghanistan, then the operation so far has been an abject failure — something seriously needs to be done to rectify this.

Sorry but this IS our war. Iraq was not. But Afghanistan and the Pakistani Tribal Areas really IS our war. They attacked us first, and then sheltered the culprits. They asked for it, and then they got it, in greater measure than they had imagined they would.

Jan 03, 2013 5:54am EST  --  Report as abuse
kenradke11 wrote:

Get them all!!!

Jan 03, 2013 6:04am EST  --  Report as abuse
americanguy wrote:

One more missile, one less really criminal piece of garbage on the planet. The earth is smelling a lot better these days.

Jan 03, 2013 7:33am EST  --  Report as abuse

The farther you isolate yourself from other people, the easier it becomes to kill them.

Jan 03, 2013 7:48am EST  --  Report as abuse
frankinca wrote:

As a US citizen and mostly law abiding, I protest the killing of foreign people in foreign countries as inhumane and not law abiding. My government has become callous about human life and dignity and is starting to eliminate people who disagree with their goals. with tactics not supported by rule of law. Projecting this to the future implies I am in danger too, and should have a weapon to protect myself from illegal government activities. Asa our overspending has gone too far, so has our killing of people who disagree with our goals a public trial with at least with a paid ACLU lawyer in defense must be mandatory before taking another human life for opinion based reasons. Most of the people that disagree with our policies don’t have to be feared unless they come here and open fire. Everyone should have that type of Constitutional protection, whomever and wherever they are. Sometimes I hate my country’s government for reasons like these and would move to some country whose existence didn’t depend on others thinking and doing the same as we. As a senior in age person. I am going to support the ALCU more and political parties less as their goals and mine are more similar. Rule of law with a Constitutional bent. Thanks for reading and considering without wanting to take the law in your own hands.

Jan 03, 2013 9:01am EST  --  Report as abuse
Timbuk3 wrote:

If the Taliban agrees to peace with the US, to stop killing and plotting to kill Americans, then this war is over.

Jan 03, 2013 9:17am EST  --  Report as abuse
MetalHead8 wrote:

The Terrorist are losing this Game of Drones.

@mattewlyman – Agreed

Jan 03, 2013 10:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
PenRumi wrote:

The death of Taliban leader Mullah Nazir and his associates has once again proven that drone strikes are working spectacularly.

The US has been forced to resort to drone strikes only because the Pakistan military will no take out the Taliban insurgents and extremists operating from the soil of Pakistan in spite of repeated requests by the State Department. If the extremists are no taken out they will end up on the streets of America and Europe. The Toulouse attack in 2011, when a French-born extremist trained in the tribal region of Pakistan killed seven people in southwest France, is one of many examples.

In this article, a Pakistan military officer described Mullah Nazir an ally of Pakistan. Pakistan continues to play a double game when dealing with terrorists and routinely uses geopolitics/strategic purpose to explain their inaction against the Taliban who are all Pushtoons. The reason for the duplicity of the Pakistan military is simple: Sheer cowardice. The Pakistan military is terrified of fighting the Pushtoons.

Jan 03, 2013 11:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
frankinca wrote:

Who is the Taliban???? They consist of tribes in Pakistan doing what they have done for centuries. Are we to change them for our purposes. Wake up and mind your/our own business about cultural activities!!

Jan 03, 2013 1:06pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

@MatthewLysman:

The British was never able to colonize Afghanistan.
They tried, but failed.

We and our western allies co-operated in colonizing Africa, in colonizing Indo-China, in demilitarizing the Nazi ally Japan, but no country has EVER disarmed or conquered Afghanistan.

Neither could the Russians, though the Russians tried;
and we armed and trained Bin Laden to oppose the Russians there.

The terrain gives the locals great advantage.

Jan 03, 2013 2:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

And we made the girls’ education an excuse for our killing thousands of civilians, hundreds by drones. Anyone remember Diane Sawyer’s post about the reason to fight the Taliban is for the girls, and the Times Magazine cover. Briefly, there was a feel good moment; then all the clear minded start to ask: “If you make these innocent, defenseless girls the excuse for killing thousands of civilians with unmanned drones, a move opposed by many human rights activists who voted for Obama like me, isn’t Diane Sawyer and Times making these young girls easy target for the Taliban? It isn’t like we don’t know what they are like!

If we want to contribute to their school, go ahead, donate books, computers, pay for construction costs. However, even when Diane Sawyer did the report, there was a subtle chill that went down my spine— it seemed to be more contrived news for the American audience, for the purpose of boosting their commercial cost, then a piece of report that has been well thought through, from A to Z, with the welfare of Pakistani and Afghanistan women as first priority. That’s so often with the rhetoric in our news; it’s deplorable, and is essentially dragging our country downhill, and contributing to dragging the world economy indirectly with it.

Jan 03, 2013 2:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

And we made the girls’ education an excuse for our killing thousands of civilians, hundreds by drones. Anyone remember Diane Sawyer’s post about the reason to fight the Taliban is for the girls, and the Times Magazine cover. Briefly, there was a feel good moment; then all the clear minded start to ask: “If you make these innocent, defenseless girls the excuse for killing thousands of civilians with unmanned drones, a move opposed by many human rights activists who voted for Obama like me, isn’t Diane Sawyer and Times making these young girls easy target for the Taliban? It isn’t like we don’t know what they are like!

If we want to contribute to their school, go ahead, donate books, computers, pay for construction costs. However, even when Diane Sawyer did the report, there was a subtle chill that went down my spine— it seemed to be more contrived news for the American audience, for the purpose of boosting their commercial cost, then a piece of report that has been well thought through, from A to Z, with the welfare of Pakistani and Afghanistan women as first priority. That’s so often with the rhetoric in our news; it’s deplorable, and is essentially dragging our country downhill, and contributing to dragging the world economy further down with it.

Jan 03, 2013 2:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

@matthewslyman:

You said, “They attacked us first.”

If you mean Bin Laden, many have asked what happened when we trained Bin Laden and the Taliban to go against the Russians in that region.
We were fighting in their land first, ostensibly for the locals.
What went wrong that caused it to back fire so badly that we, as a country, is reeling so badly from the aftermath. It’s been reported that Bin Laden knew that we would look for him and waste tons of money, and squander away our economy till we become a second class economy– could that be true? If it is true, even if we kill them, and another dozen Bin Ladens and Taliban leader like this one, they are still achieving their ultimate goal, and we are still losing the war though winning the battles. Is that possible?

What’s in the classified material that would make us understand what caused Bin Laden, and the troops we trained and armed to flip against us. Did they really attack us first, or was it the same sort of complaint like now — we claimed to be helping the locals, but if our goal was really to pick a fight with the Russians there, we might not behaved in a way that matched our rhetoric( again!) In any case, we cannot just start with 9-11 without asking our Government what’s in the classified information that details the exchanges between the Taliban, Bin Laden and our boys in this same mountainous and treacherous region. What lesson could we learn, to behave differently, so that the people we armed and trained wouldn’t be making the decision to turn against us, paying us back on our own soil, so to speak, so readily, and seemingly so smoothly the first time.

Jan 03, 2013 3:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

Alternatively, maybe it wasn’t something we did while we were training the Taliban & Bin Laden. Maybe Bin Laden was deliberately misleading us when posing to be pro-American to get our arms and our training, with the plan to know our military tactics, the way our troops co-ordinate, communicate with our Government, our philosophy, deliberately to find our weaknesses, even before getting training from us. If this latter situation were true, it wasn’t the first time, this happened to Japan, whom we supported militarily, tactically, politically, helping them to expand cruelly, violate human rights, commit crimes against humanity & conquer Korea with big lies, and get land from China in the 1890s and supporting them as they invaded in the 1920s and 1930s before WWII broke out. We woke up from our Asian mirage, years and years later, waking to Japanese bombs at Pearl Harbor the 9-11 in American 20th century history.

Likewise, how do we not know that they are giving us baits to kill some of them, in order to increase the Taliban success in local propaganda

We were misled or fooled or unable to follow up when we supplied arms to the Taliban and Bin Laden; we were misled and fooled when we supplied arms to the Japanese until they attacked us at Pearl Harbor, which was the 9-11 of the 1940s. And now so many are thinking, just rent-an-army from Japan again like we foolishly and cruelly did a century ago, sell them arms, manufacture propaganda that are based on FABRICATED RACIST CHARACTERIZATION BASED ON KANEKO’S ARYAN RACE AND HITLER’S ARYAN RACE THEORIES, to go against China.

When are we going to learn?

Don’t win the battles, while we go more and more deeply towards losing war in the competition for the hearts and minds of the locals, in any country where we plan to send troops. One always loses the war when we lose the war on the hearts and minds of the locals, if not immediately, eventually, as in Vietnam.

That’s what we are doing in Pakistan, Afghanistan as we dump money; that’s what we are doing in China, supporting the same exact Japanese militaristic philosophy, sloppily ignoring all the circular logic, the harassment, the blatant lies of Japan, that fooled us before, all for political reasons! Aren’t we unwise!

When is Obama going to start acting smarter!

Obama: are you winning a battle, and forgetting the war on terrorism!

Jan 03, 2013 4:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@matthewslyman

We had no issue with supporting the Taliban against the USSR. Prior to 9-11 no one talked about taking out the Taliban. Their only crime was not allowing us to invade their country to kill al Qaeda. So we invaded anyways, removed their leadership, installed our own handpicked puppets and conducted our war of revenge. We removed All Queda , we are now killing Taliban in Pakistan, another nation that refuses to allow us to operate on the ground, that harbored Bin Laden. A bit hypocritical of us isn’t it. My main point is this is why we have events like 9-11. We can’t mind our own business in the world. We can’t save everyone, we kill more innocents than any other nation. And we can’t understand why we are so hated.

Jan 03, 2013 6:12pm EST  --  Report as abuse
rishqo wrote:

These strikes obviously cannot be accomplished with HUGE intelligence help from among local people. They certainly don`t do that out of sheer benevolence and admiration of USA and their “war on terror”. They do that just for money or to settle old tribal scores and personal grudges. They are traitors of their nation and of their fellow countrymen just like those who send bombers to kill innocents on the streets or in mosques. And traitors deserve just one punishment…I`m convinced every US patriot would agree.

Jan 03, 2013 6:29pm EST  --  Report as abuse
WwokenUup wrote:

@rishqo:
Some informants believe in the American way of life as portrayed to them.
The physician who got DNA from children, posing as immunizations, to get Bin Laden’s DNA thought he was doing human nature a favor, to get rid of a terrorist. And he sacrificed his life believing he was doing a benevolent thing to the world — and he gave his life for it.

So don’t by hypocritical and bash the informants.

Jan 05, 2013 12:41am EST  --  Report as abuse
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