Bigelow directs "Zero Dark Thirty" torture critics to Washington

Comments (7)
plukasiak wrote:

shame on Bigelow for attempting to finesse the real problem with Zero Dark Thirty. The problem isn’t that she depicted torture, the problem is that she depicted torture as an effective tool in the hunt for Bin Laden. If Bigelow doesn’t think that torture played a role, why bother including it in a film about the hunt for bin Laden. After all, it would be irrelevant to the movie UNLESS it were shown that torture actually interfered with the hunt — and Bigelow didn’t show us that.

The kindest thing that can be said about Bigelow at this point is that she depicted torture for purely pruient reasons — the movie needed something visceral early on keep the audience interested in the talkathon that follows until the “bunker” sequence.

Jan 16, 2013 3:48pm EST  --  Report as abuse
jimmyv wrote:

Two comments: Ms. Bigelow’s comments in the last paragraph says that Bin Laden was killed by ordinary Americans who fought bravely even as they sometimes crossed moral lines. However, I vividly remember seeing Mr.Obama on national television saying HE had gotten Bin Laden; not the intelligence community, not the Navy Seals, not 1000′s of hours of waiting and watching.

Secondly: Instead of trying to blame U.S. qofficials for the use of torture, SHE NEEDS TO ACCEPT responsibility for portraying it in her film. And ANYONE who believes torture is not used by Americans is unbelievably naive. I have no doubt it is horrible, but do our spy agencies and intelligence communities use torture to glean information? HELL YES.

Jan 16, 2013 10:40pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Levendi wrote:

The political left wing and Hollywood hate everything that America stands for yet they do so by the very freedom that it provides them. They need Sharia law or a dictator to sober them up. To help them remember who brought them to the dance. Why they can make the films they make or say the things they say or do the things they do. They would be stoned or beheaded or banished to some third world jail run by a third world leader like Chavez or Castro, the monsters they praise. Or socialism or communism their romantic version of it. Ask them how man people were slaughtered by Muslims (Armenians and Greeks) or how many people were slaughtered by communism. Russia, China, Vietnam?

Jan 16, 2013 10:58pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Levendi wrote:

The political left wing and Hollywood hate everything that America stands for yet they do so by the very freedom that it provides them. They need Sharia law or a dictator to sober them up. To help them remember who brought them to the dance. Why they can make the films they make or say the things they say or do the things they do. They would be stoned or beheaded or banished to some third world jail run by a third world leader like Chavez or Castro, the monsters they praise. Or socialism or communism their romantic version of it. Ask them how man people were slaughtered by Muslims (Armenians and Greeks) or how many people were slaughtered by communism. Russia, China, Vietnam?

Jan 16, 2013 10:58pm EST  --  Report as abuse
doctorwarren wrote:

What saddens me is that people are talking about the “efficiency” of torture rather than the “morality” of it. For one thing, these people always talk about claimed successes and prefer to sweep under the rug that, by the very nature of a torture campaign, far more innocents will be tortured than guilty. If this is what it takes imagine yourself, naked and helpless, screaming your throat out while pitiless men press you further and further into agony while promising to end your pain if you’ll only answer them. But you DO NOT HAVE THE ANSWERS. They have the wrong person or an enemy has lied to them.

I’m not a soft-hearted person. I have no problem with the death penalty. In fact, I’d have no problem torturing some people to death ONCE THEY ARE TRIED. However, our present system is based on torture on suspicion. Can you live with that?

Also, it is clearly a slippery slope. The argument is “we need to torture to save lives.” OK, a little girl is missing. We know from history that it is likely that it is a recidivist who is known to police. Do we bring in all of them in the locality and torture them? One probably knows where she is and we can save a life. Isn’t that enough? A murder is committed and we have a suspect. Torture him? We can provide justice. Someone has stolen Johnny’s lunch money.

You can see the progression. It won’t go that far, but how far could well meaning people allow it to go once it’s accepted?

During WWII, Germans went out of their way to surrender to US forces because they knew they could expect decent treatment. Who will willingly surrender now when to do so means screaming agony?

Finally, while I’m sure the CIA has members who completely enjoy torturing people, for most people the act itself is soul-destroying. Do we have the right to ask our military people, who are already risking their lives, to also risk their immortal souls?

Jan 16, 2013 11:31pm EST  --  Report as abuse
justamaz wrote:

Is there really anyone, besides a few narrow minded twirps and Actor David Clennon, who care? Non-issue, non-story!

Jan 16, 2013 11:44pm EST  --  Report as abuse
zflynn3 wrote:

Typical of so many naive Americans to get all worked up over the fiction in order to pretend the reality doesn’t exist.
Having served in military security forces I can attest that the vast bulk of interrogations use techniques that are akin to torture. Why are they used? Because they work. In VERY short order, with virtually anyone, it’s quite easy to get him to “crack” and give up anyone, everyone, even admit to things you want him to say but that he didn’t do or know anything about. Are most people so deluded to think war doesn’t bring out the worst and most heinous actions and counter-actions? Get real. I admire Bigelow as a film maker for not telling the story in the typical sanitized, bullsh+t manner that makes it “family friendly” but also a big, fat lie.

Jan 16, 2013 11:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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