Algeria vows to fight Qaeda after 38 workers killed

Comments (30)
westpath wrote:

While the loss of innocent life is deeply saddening, one can understand the hard line Algerian approach to terrorism. Negotiation with terrorists always means the same thing: You give in to their demands. Algeria’s message to terrorists is stark and simple: If you commit a terrorist act on our territory, we will kill you.

Jan 21, 2013 6:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
sylvan wrote:

I hope those drones over Yemen are seeking to give one eyed Marlboro man a light.

Jan 21, 2013 6:14am EST  --  Report as abuse
Walt_P wrote:

“We opened the door for negotiations with the Westerners and the Algerians, and granted them safety from the beginning of the operation, but one of the senior (Algerian) intelligence officials confirmed to us in a phone call that they will destroy the place with everyone in it,” SITE quoted the statement as saying.

The Algerian “secular” leaders apparently have the same mind-set as the Syrian “secular” leaders. Algeria is a prime candidate for a major bloodbath.

Jan 21, 2013 7:19am EST  --  Report as abuse
GeorgeBrown wrote:

By getting involved in Libya NATO has destabilized the entire Sahel. Islamists are now armed with a large quantity of sophisticated weapons from Qaddafi’s arsenal.

These Islamists likely made off with Soviet-made portable anti-aircraft missiles, French anti-tank missiles (ironically enough), mines, heavy machine guns, sniper rifles, RPGs, even T-72 tanks, APCs and god knows how much ammunition. The SA-7 and SA-24 anti-aircraft missiles can be used to bring down airliners or sold on the black market for a good profit.

Qaddafi was an s.o.b. but towards the end he was our s.o.b.. Why NATO gave up that stability to support the jihadists is odd to say the least. The entire region is now awash in deadly weapons and revitalized jihadists.

We should support the Algerian government rather than make the same mistake we made in Libya.

Jan 21, 2013 7:47am EST  --  Report as abuse
Dz_knight wrote:

Clear that you know nothing about Algeria Mr. Walt_P ; we already had our “bloodbath” during the 90s; and we learned the lesson… About the approach taken by the Algerian again the terrorist, check out the results from the French, the Russian, and the American with their advanced technologies, and smart weapons… it is called “Terrorism”, not a blockbuster sir… salutations to all.

Jan 21, 2013 7:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
mikesomersde wrote:

” Walt_P wrote:

The Algerian “secular” leaders apparently have the same mind-set as the Syrian “secular” leaders. Algeria is a prime candidate for a major bloodbath.”

So, we are supposed to view those terrorists as misunderstood victims? Everything would have been fine if the Algerian government had just cooperated? How naive is it possible for one person to be?

Jan 21, 2013 8:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
kommy wrote:

“Sharia patrols” began to operate in London. I guess those are the “good” guys.

Read more: http://theeuropeanaffairs.blogspot.ca/2013/01/sharia-patrols-began-to-operate-in.html

Jan 21, 2013 9:01am EST  --  Report as abuse
Vuenbelvue wrote:

510,000 bbl/d exported to USA. This may be down since USA became self sufficient in 2011-2012 Also, this is where Hurricanes in Caribbean are seeded.
Exports
In 2011, Algeria’s estimated crude oil exports were 750,000 bbl/d, of which the largest portion went to North America, mainly to the United States. In 2010, Algeria’s estimated total oil exports (including all liquids) were 1.5 million bbl/d. According to EIA estimates, the United States imported an average of 510,000 bbl/d from Algeria in 2010, of which 328,000 bbl/d was crude oil. The United States was the largest single importer of Algerian crude oil in both years. http://www.eia.gov/cabs/Algeria/Full.html

Jan 21, 2013 9:28am EST  --  Report as abuse
trex2561 wrote:

I live in Minnesota. We also have been fostering terrorism by bringing a lot of these unworthy people into the USA, mostly sponsored by churches and later by their own countrymen. We feed them,clothe them, take care of their medical needs, and give them enough money to send back home via non-controlled money transfer services owned and run by Muslims that we know almost nothing about. We have a large Somali community here and I know that the FBI is watching over them very closely. If we were anything like them they would be back in a Muslim country somewhere trying to eke out a living.

Jan 21, 2013 9:28am EST  --  Report as abuse
graycat wrote:

Who is obama taking advice from? jimmy carter?

Jan 21, 2013 9:45am EST  --  Report as abuse
Fromkin wrote:

@GeorgeBrown

We should not let the media mislead us. The arsenal was supplied to militants by the West and paid for mainly by Qatar. Qatar and Saud Arabia are the main sponsors of terrorism and of western aggressions.

Let Gaddafi find in death peace that his enemies refused him on earth.

Terrorists do not need Gaddafi’s arsenal to terrorize people. There are plenty of weapons in the world terrorists can use and which the US is the number one global supplier. Gaddafi successfully fought these terrorists. They did not need Gaddafi’s arsenal in this algerian operation and certainly not when they kill 3,000 innocent people in NY.

All these conflicts are motivated by profit and caused by corporate greed which uses terrorism as a tool.

Jan 21, 2013 9:54am EST  --  Report as abuse
Doc62 wrote:

Blaming our country for Libya’s arsenal is stupid. NATO/US supplied only air support. Gaddafi used his oil$ to buy arms. Like it or not, all these islamic countries are autonomous and have the final say on their own security. Especially when they supply us with oil.
Bin Laden used 2 United & 2 American jets(bipartisan) to carry out the 9/11 attacks. Do we blame our airlines or our government? NO! We blame the criminals.

Jan 21, 2013 11:13am EST  --  Report as abuse
gowintec wrote:

The apostle Paul wrote: “We have a wrestling, not against blood and flesh, but against the governments, against the authorities, against the world rulers of this darkness, against the wicked spirit forces in the heavenly places.” (Ephesians 6:12) Even today, demonic forces under the control of Satan the Devil are behind the scenes, exercising influence on human rulers and on mankind in general, prompting them to commit unspeakable acts of genocide, terrorism, and murder.

Jan 21, 2013 11:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
ogobeone wrote:

The narrative in the old days was that the Algerian government annulled a free and fair election. Now it is said that the subsequent war was with Islamic militants. I guess I’m confused. Perhaps the Islamics won that election?

Jan 21, 2013 11:51am EST  --  Report as abuse
xcanada2 wrote:

As I recall (and below from Wikipedia re Algerian civil war):
“The conflict began in December 1991, when the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) party gained popularity amongst the Algerian people and the National Liberation Front (FLN) party, fearing the former’s victory, cancelled elections after the first round. At this time the country’s military effectively took control of the government, and president Chadli Bendjedid was forced from office. After the FIS was banned and thousands of its members arrested, Islamist guerrillas rapidly emerged and began an armed campaign against the government and its supporters.”
That is, the West didn’t like the election results (similar to Hamas win), and therefore started a war against what clearly was about to become the democratically elected government of Algeria. This lead to Islamic terrorist groups representing the previous to-be-elected Islamic government (and others). Total loss of life in the ensuing civil was is estimated to be 46-200 thousand people (out of 1/10 the population of the US).

Of course, the mosques are the one institution that cannot be shut down in North Africa by secular, military dictatorships such as we supported and benefited from in Algeria and elsewhere. Therefore, the mosques are the only place that major opposition can come from (until the general populace is sufficiently enraged, as in Tunisia-Egypt and a growing number of ME countries).

It appears that the present unfortunate loss of life of desert gas industry workers is another case of blowback from the corrupt Western imperialism. Al Qaeda seems to have become a general resistance group to Western efforts to control the ME and now parts of North Africa. We started Al Qaeda in the 1990 to get Russia, still work with Al Qaeda when convenient (now Syria, earlier Iraq), and of course take regular Blowback from them.

After more than twenty years of battling Al Qaeda, we seem only to have spread them out and increased their strength. If the West put more effort into understanding what is driving Al Qaeda, and not just cursing the terrible terrorists and blathering about getting them (clearly not working), it might better see how to deal with Al Queda. Undoubtedly, it will involve more understanding of, and maybe even help with, the legitimate aspirations of ME and NA people. Simply trying to engineer these people to our (corporate) needs, is not working.

Jan 21, 2013 12:15pm EST  --  Report as abuse
bleggo wrote:

The way I see it is you have alot of unemployed young men in a poor stagnant economic, social, educational enviornment willing to prove there manhood. You have many radical adults pushing their agenda on these young men and they are more than willing to take up the test and let that testosterone run it’s course. Of course the leaders won’t join in the bloodshed. They are smart. It’s a classic tale of Ulysses acting in a terrorist enviornment. When you don’t have hope you want drama and in this case from what I hear, “They wanted to spread chaos across N Africa.”

Jan 21, 2013 1:28pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Dinosaur wrote:

Let me guess. If the weapons used by al Queda were from Libya, then the US Benghazi branch of Fast & Furious should receive creditor blame? Scary stuff.

Jan 21, 2013 4:07pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Stu_ell wrote:

Hmmm,

All these weapons are manufactured in the West (with a few Russian exceptions).

Q. How do you think they got there?
A. We sold them into the region.

Also the Western media is truly awful when it comes to reporting geopolitical skirmishes like this.

Who are “Islamists”? Is that a new word designed to confuse us and unwittingly draw an association with 9/11? Come on. Everyone from Marrakech to Kashmir could be called an “Islamist”. What a ridiculous term.

It’s just another quasi civil war that the West has decided to wade into to protect our commercial interests. Why does the media feel the need to wrap us up in cotton wool and pretend their is some grand super evil organisation out there that we are fighting?
AKA Al Qaida.

Let’s just get back to reporting the reality of the situation.

There are 3 things in the third world.

1). Mercenaries
2). Natural Resources
3). Innocent people

Let’s stop dreaming up tales of fiction to make the situation more palatable. If Western democracies were more honest about the reality of the situation then the situation would probably dramatically improve. Transparency is a good thing.

Jan 21, 2013 7:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Stu_ell wrote:

Hmmm,

All these weapons are manufactured in the West (with a few Russian exceptions).

Q. How do you think they got there?
A. We sold them into the region.

Also the Western media is truly awful when it comes to reporting geopolitical skirmishes like this.

Who are “Islamists”? Is that a new word designed to confuse us and unwittingly draw an association with 9/11? Come on. Everyone from Marrakech to Kashmir could be called an “Islamist”. What a ridiculous term.

It’s just another quasi civil war that the West has decided to wade into to protect our commercial interests. Why does the media feel the need to wrap us up in cotton wool and pretend their is some grand super evil organisation out there that we are fighting?
AKA Al Qaida.

Let’s just get back to reporting the reality of the situation.

There are 3 things in the third world.

1). Mercenaries
2). Natural Resources
3). Innocent people

Let’s stop dreaming up tales of fiction to make the situation more palatable. If Western democracies were more honest about the reality of the situation then the situation would probably dramatically improve. Transparency is a good thing.

Jan 21, 2013 7:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fromkin wrote:

@Xcanada2
“After more than twenty years of battling Al Qaeda,”

I usually agree with most your posts but I do not believe that the West spent 20 years fighting AQ. It might be that it’s been fighting one wing or a certain leadership of AQ but as an organization it’s always been an ally to the West. Once OBL is out, no more problems with AQ.

Jan 21, 2013 7:26pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fromkin wrote:

@Doc62

You’re missing the big picture. The blame is not for the arsenal or even the country but for the short sighted policy of some officials.

Arming islamist militants in Libya, some of them known terrorists straight from guantanamo, was not the right thing to do.

Terrorists are being recycled for a perpetual “war on terror”…

Jan 21, 2013 7:42pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Fromkin wrote:

@agobeone

I am no expert but no all islamists are militants/insurgents. Among islamists you have extremists and moderates. You have Wahabists, salafists, takfirists, Muslim brothers, Shia, Sunnis, etc,,, There are also many ideologies…

Jan 21, 2013 7:54pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Today’s terrorist tomorrow’s freedom fighters, depending how you look at it. When I saw “zero dark 30″ I was thinking to myself when will the next terrorist take place and where, sure enough there it is.
This is not going to stop anytime soon till a whole new generation grows up saying enough is enough.

Jan 21, 2013 8:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse

Today’s terrorist tomorrow’s freedom fighters, depending how you look at it. When I saw “zero dark 30″ I was thinking to myself when will the next terrorist take place and where, sure enough there it is.
This is not going to stop anytime soon till a whole new generation grows up saying enough is enough.

Jan 21, 2013 8:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Lowell_Thinks wrote:

Hey Canada, aren’t you glad you extended the welcome mat? Our strength is in our diversity?

God Bless the Tea Party.

Liberalism: Moochers voting in looters to steal from producers.

Jan 21, 2013 8:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Azza9 wrote:

Living in peace with extremists is starting to look more hopeless each day.
Looks like the only recourse of action is to cause their extinction.
I’m not talking about reasonable minded moderate Muslims either or Muslims at all. I’m speaking of any sort of extreme ideology/ religion.

Balance is the key to harmony, and sometimes to balance a scale you must remove some weights from one side.

Jan 21, 2013 9:03pm EST  --  Report as abuse
bates148 wrote:

Unfortunately, this story is buried due to the inauguration. Three Americans killed in another terrorist attack. Very sad.

Jan 21, 2013 11:23pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Yesyes wrote:

@bates148 Why do only the dead Americans matter to you?

Jan 22, 2013 12:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
johneurope wrote:

Living in peace with extremists is starting to look more hopeless each day.
“ooks like the only recourse of action is to cause their extinction.
I’m not talking about reasonable minded moderate Muslims either or Muslims at all. I’m speaking of any sort of extreme ideology/ religion.

Balance is the key to harmony, and sometimes to balance a scale you must remove some weights from one side. ”

Agreed all religion has its crazies.

We need Algeria to run the so called war on Terror. It seems to be the only country that gets results. So terrorist groups know to avoid Algeria or you go to Paradise very soon.. Algeria understands they do not negeoiate. And the taking of hostages get you nothn but death, that should be the message. That is the one they work with the terrorist.

Jan 22, 2013 1:07am EST  --  Report as abuse
NorthStarMan wrote:

Sad for the innocents who lost their lives, but well done Algeria. We also need to make sure that we have a no holds barred approach to interrogations throughout the Western world, whose governments are too squeamish to authorize a proper job. When the next crisis arises perhaps we should swap the hostages for some bleeding heart liberals.

Jan 22, 2013 5:50am EST  --  Report as abuse
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