Former Microsoft executive says CEO Ballmer culls internal rivals to retain power

Comments (13)
zato wrote:

Ballmer’s close ties to Satan are what keep him in power.

Jan 22, 2013 4:23am EST  --  Report as abuse
tmc wrote:

I thought he should have left arounf 2010 too. I can’t imaging how he has held on. Makes me really wonder about the way we run corporate America now.

Jan 22, 2013 5:27am EST  --  Report as abuse
russmillerwy wrote:

The problem with Microsoft is that they’ve never been an innovative company. They made their fortune by mimicking (as mentioned above) the products of usually much smaller companies and then muscling those companies out of the marketplace to create monopolies. For a good couple of decades people, and especially companies, grudgingly paid fortunes to Microsoft for necessary products like operating systems and office suites that Microsoft neither invented or did much to improve. Google and Apple, however, are now big enough to resist Microsoft’s atrophying monopolistic muscle, and a decade of genuine innovation has given us amazing search engines, smart phones, and tablets that made all of Microsoft’s old products obsolete. Ballmer has certainly succeeded with the Seahawks, so I wouldn’t dump Microsoft’s malaise on his doorstep. The company’s philosophy dictated that it would eventually go where Standard Oil and Ma Bell went.

Jan 22, 2013 5:52am EST  --  Report as abuse
russmillerwy wrote:

The problem with Microsoft is that they’ve never been an innovative company. They made their fortune by mimicking (as mentioned above) the products of usually much smaller companies and then muscling those companies out of the marketplace to create monopolies. For a good couple of decades people, and especially companies, grudgingly paid fortunes to Microsoft for necessary products like operating systems and office suites that Microsoft neither invented or did much to improve. Google and Apple, however, are now big enough to resist Microsoft’s atrophying monopolistic muscle, and a decade of genuine innovation has given us amazing search engines, smart phones, and tablets that made all of Microsoft’s old products obsolete. Ballmer has certainly succeeded with the Seahawks, so I wouldn’t dump Microsoft’s malaise on his doorstep. The company’s philosophy dictated that it would eventually go where Standard Oil and Ma Bell went.

Jan 22, 2013 5:52am EST  --  Report as abuse
moneywon wrote:

@russmillerwy Funny, I’ve read that opinion after every release MS has made since 1990 and they’re still on over 50% of all OS, even with Win7 (and the phone market is climbing even though they shouldn’t be in it). Comparing MS to Google & Apple is like comparing Wells Fargo to Goldman Sachs. Yes, they’re all big companies in the same industry, but with different product sets and markets, and posing little threat to one another. That said, Ballmer should go, his vision is wrong for MS.

Jan 22, 2013 8:42am EST  --  Report as abuse
tmc wrote:

I think they may have been right to move into the hardware market though. Besides the OS, they also have a significant part of just about all business data. That’s their “other” flagship product group; Office. Businesses have different needs than individuals. Hardware makers are declaring the PC dead, but not really offering business any solution to the vast amount of PCs and Microsoft data they have. Ipads don’t play well on a corporate network. Microsoft can target hardware into this market though, as they are doing with Surface. I do believe it is time for Mr. Ballmer to let go of Microsoft, but to another venture, not retirement. As if someone like him could retire.

Jan 22, 2013 9:06am EST  --  Report as abuse
SanPa wrote:

At some point, investors will see the 10′s of billions lost by and of Ballmer and do the right thing.

Jan 22, 2013 11:50am EST  --  Report as abuse
Frankxr wrote:

While there are lessons to learn from the past, I for one am much more interested in the course to move forward – which I hope is in the book.
Microsoft has some unique challenges migrating to new open technologies and business cases due to the scope and maturity of the organization. Expeditious management of this transformation in a manner that does not undermine employee, partners, shareholders is a much greater challenge than running a software or channel organization. Microsoft is changing, but admittedly not on a timeline and with the bravado that many persons would appreciate. Microsoft’s successful navigation of the transformation across its business to open standards and services could in fact drive more success for the company than has ever been experienced in the past.
It is important to realize that leadership is not just a function of smarts, capability, or even having a dynamic persona. Leadership is also about faith. If a manager loses the faith of their team, customers, shareholders (for whatever reason) it can undermine their ability to lead. The challenge for Microsoft is about brand perception and the need to reshape the lens of consideration. Perception of Microsoft brand value has waned in the last decade under the duress of legislation and competitive innovation. Nowhere is this truer than with the younger generation. Steps need to be taken to reshape the company’s image and regain its perception of prominence as an industry leader. Microsoft brand needs to once again become synonymous with products and services which enhance the daily lives of consumers, help businesses succeed, and that benefits an ecosystem of new age partners.

Jan 22, 2013 12:32pm EST  --  Report as abuse
penlite wrote:

I noted in a post that Ballmer has got go. This is when when Google and Apple’s products were becoming well known and picking up steam, and Facebook was on the prowl for social market share. During this MS hit a stagnant point when they couldn’t answer to Apple and Google phones, moreover Google’s web application products. I knew then it was time to let Ballmer go and bring someone younger and vibrant. One who understood the web integration. Of course that didn’t happen and look where MS is now.

Jan 22, 2013 12:38pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Regular wrote:

Something amazed me for very long time – why Balmer still leads Microsoft? Investors always wanted him to go (see the share value). Many employees in MS never like him (this article is just one example). Only person that keeps him in his position is the great chairman himself. I guess the founder is not much interested in MS future, rather he is into philanthropy (I admire him for that lot these days). By looking at tepid interest in Windows 8 and growing interest in Linux server systems and android and apple software (cloud can be a big thing in future where android and ios will outshine others), MS probably is going down the path of no return, the rate, which at present simply depends on how fast those older windows systems and applications are replaced with newer lighter non-windows applications.

Jan 22, 2013 12:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
sirenpower wrote:

russmillerwy: “Ballmer has certainly succeeded with the Seahawks”… huh? Paul Allen owns the Seahawks. Ballmer & Microsoft have nothing to do with the Seahawks except as sponsors.

Ballmer is mid-20th century salesman and has kept MSFT stuck in that mode. Also, Ballmer is one of the very few people on earth who believe in the stack-ranking model of performance evaluation, which has poisoned the culture at Microsoft beyond repair.

Jan 22, 2013 4:09pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Sac-kings wrote:

In all fronts who is this guy! It means too me big money is going after the Sacrmento Kings. The State of California should boycott all Microsolf products.Seattle and Ballmer find another team to support!

Jan 22, 2013 5:47pm EST  --  Report as abuse
reset wrote:

Ballmer’s head looks like of hollywood Vampire Villain. HaHa. Bad Guy !

Jan 22, 2013 8:27pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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