Boeing forecast assumes little impact from 787 problems

Comments (3)
Harry079 wrote:

“Boeing sees no big impact from 787 woes”

Well since they were BLIND to the 787 battery problems I can see why they would say that.

There are 50 787′s in service that are ground.

There are around another 75 that have been built but not delivered so they are sitting in a big parking lot somewhere.

They are continuing to build more planes.

The planes were not grounded until mid-january so the fourth quarter was not effected. Everyday those 50 planes are ground and the other 75 just sitting around with more being built it’s costing someone millions of dollars a day.

If these problems are not identified and fixed within a few weeks Boeing is going to be in Big Trouble in little Seattle.

Jan 30, 2013 10:52am EST  --  Report as abuse
sjfella wrote:

Too early to have a “big impact”, but it’s coming.

Jan 30, 2013 1:08pm EST  --  Report as abuse
kafantaris wrote:

Since large lithium batteries are a headache — if not inherently dangerous — we have to look at alternatives. One is to go back to the heavier nickel-cadmium batteries.
Another is to use fuel cells. Fuel cells are now used in warehouse lifts and they supply unattended backup power to cell towers.
Why not use them in commercial airplanes? They proved reliable for over a decade in our space Shuttle.
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/shuttle/reference/shutref/orbiter/eps/pwrplants.html
What about cost? With $16,000 for a lithium battery, cost is relative. Moreover, fuel cells are now a sixth of what they were five years ago.
What about the Hindenburg?
Those flames etched in our minds came from the fresh paint on the tarp. Hydrogen itself burns colorless, last about a second, and the flames goes straight up.
But where would we store the hydrogen? In tanks of the type now used in fuel cell cars — and they can be refilled every time the plane refuels.
Or we could go with low pressure, though heavier, metal hydride tanks. This could eventually lead to our use of hydrides as artificial muscles — to operate the plane’s wings, brakes and landing gear. Metal hydrides can do this easily by us merely changing the current of the heating element inside the tank.
http://news.discovery.com/tech/biotechnology/artificial-muscle-hydrogen-artificial.htm

Jan 30, 2013 2:51pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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