Samsung Electronics says loses a Japan patent lawsuit to Apple

Comments (5)
americanguy wrote:

Can’t think of a better way to win customers than to constantly sue each other and act like spoiled brats.

Feb 28, 2013 7:37am EST  --  Report as abuse
wthcares wrote:

The way things are today the only way I would switch from iPhone to Droid of any handset is if Apple goes out of business. I just prefer Apple’s ecosystem, not dissing Droid, Samsung, et. al. I wish they could play nice in the same sandbox!!

Feb 28, 2013 9:26am EST  --  Report as abuse
Wolfie-gang wrote:

Samsung, you are such a blatant copycat, and everyone knows it, no matter how much you bleat on about your supposed ‘intellectual property’. We all know you copied the iPhone, blatantly, wether the courts support it or not.

Feb 28, 2013 10:20am EST  --  Report as abuse
XDC wrote:

Wolfie…

Apple filed for design protections in July 2007, and before the iPhone was announced but the “minimalist” claim it shows off multiple minimalist designs sold well before Apple filed for design protections. In fact Samsung sold its F700 music player, which was released in Feb. 2007. Ironically, Apple tried to use this player as evidence, given that it showed off the iPhone in January 2007. But Apple was forced to embarassingly retract that claim after its lawyers learned that it had been shown at Cebit 2006 (Mar. 2006). Sony also showed off design images for a new phone before July of 2007.

Samsung’s lawyers write, “Apple seeks to exclude Samsung from the market, based on its complaints that Samsung has used the very same public domain design concepts that Apple borrowed from other competitors, including Sony, to develop the iPhone.”

Apple has had a little bit of a history of “borrowing” competitors’ ideas. CEO Steve Jobs lifted the idea for his successful Mac operating system from Xerox Corp. (XRX) He once bragged, “Picasso had a saying – ‘Good artists copy, great artists steal.’ And we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.”

“Contrary to the image it has cultivated in the popular press, Apple has admitted in internal documents that its strength is not in developing new technologies first, but in successfully commercializing them.”

Did you know that Siri was originally slated for Android and that Apple bought the company just so it couldn’t be used on the Android platform? This is another perfect example of Apple “creating”.

Feb 28, 2013 2:17pm EST  --  Report as abuse
XDC wrote:

Wolfie,

Apple filed for design protections in July 2007, and before the iPhone was announced but the “minimalist” claim it shows off multiple minimalist designs sold well before Apple filed for design protections. In fact Samsung sold its F700 music player, which was released in Feb. 2007. Ironically, Apple tried to use this player as evidence, given that it showed off the iPhone in January 2007. But Apple was forced to embarassingly retract that claim after its lawyers learned that it had been shown at Cebit 2006 (Mar. 2006). Sony also showed off design images for a new phone before July of 2007.

Samsung’s lawyers write, “Apple seeks to exclude Samsung from the market, based on its complaints that Samsung has used the very same public domain design concepts that Apple borrowed from other competitors, including Sony, to develop the iPhone.”

Apple has had a little bit of a history of “borrowing” competitors’ ideas. CEO Steve Jobs lifted the idea for his successful Mac operating system from Xerox Corp. (XRX) He once bragged, “Picasso had a saying – ‘Good artists copy, great artists steal.’ And we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.”

“Contrary to the image it has cultivated in the popular press, Apple has admitted in internal documents that its strength is not in developing new technologies first, but in successfully commercializing them.”

Did you know that Siri was originally slated for Android and that Apple bought the company just so it couldn’t be used on the Android platform? This is another perfect example of Apple “creating”.

Feb 28, 2013 2:19pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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