Obama does not feel Americans' privacy violated: chief of staff

Comments (132)
GOLDENRULE wrote:

I wonder if they got hold of my mom’s carrot cake recipe. It was a secret!!!

Jun 15, 2013 8:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
amibovvered wrote:

Pull the other one!

Jun 15, 2013 9:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
StigTW wrote:

If they only need 300 then don’t collect millions…

Jun 15, 2013 9:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

The notion that it is OK for the government to collect all this information under the guise that they won’t actually look at it unless you become part of an “investigation” doesn’t wash. If government agents came to your house and photocopied everything in your file cabinets and said “Don’t worry, it’s only for possible future reference”… would that be OK? If a government agent followed you around collecting information about every place you visited and everything you bought “for possible future reference”… would that be acceptable even if they only looked at 300 of them? OF COURSE NOT! AND THIS IS NO DIFFERENT!

Jun 15, 2013 9:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ChicagoFats wrote:

I’m from the government. I’m here to help you.

Jun 15, 2013 9:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SanPa wrote:

There’s what government has done, and what they can do. It’s that “can do” that is an unnerving unknown.

Jun 15, 2013 9:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cappybob wrote:

The problem with this entire program is the misuse of collected data by “Private Contractors.” These institutions have no oversight, are for sell to the highest bidder, manipulate data (Issa Court), and are protected by the NDAA and Patriot Act from being held accountable to Individuals they have unjustly Injured.

Jun 15, 2013 9:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Laster wrote:

I feel a lot better now. Thank you. OH! and just in time for the latest on Jodi Arias!

Jun 15, 2013 9:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
hki wrote:

“but the paper says U.S. authorities only looked in detail at the records linked to fewer than 300 phone numbers” — but non-U.S. authorities working on behalf of the U.S. authorities looked at millions of detail records of honest private citizens. — Thats my bet…

Jun 15, 2013 9:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
elsewhere wrote:

I believe it was Pete Sessions, when asked if the government could do anything it wanted, he replied, yes we can. (Answer paraphrased). That was after Obamacare passed and voters were very mad.

Jun 15, 2013 10:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
taroil wrote:

So we are supposed to believe this from an administration cant help itself in screwing our rights and than covering it up, so who will audit these guys to see if they are telling the truth clearly not the same bunch, maybe the ACLU should audit them

Jun 15, 2013 10:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
taroil wrote:

Yea sure

Jun 15, 2013 10:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SenorEquis wrote:

The people citing this story like it just rebuts everything are gullible children. The NSA can be trusted to tell you they ‘only’ spied directly on 300 numbers? Please.

Jun 15, 2013 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
VonHell wrote:

But that is the point. The objective is not spying on millions of people at once… the current tech allows to create a huge database with all records… so one’s history could be seached, researched and pulled out in seconds by cross-referencing his/her phone, internet, browsing and social network… with smartphones and GPS on car and phones, the gov could even create one’s walk around history… but since companies dont keep that amount of data and simply dump it after a few months… the gov must secretly collect data for years/decades until the system becomes functional…
And ofc would not take long before the gov allow its use not only to curb terrorism and even sell the service to other countries or corporations… the potencial for good and evil are limitless…
One can see by the last american spy captured in Russia that the days on the field are over…

Jun 15, 2013 10:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
chekovmerlin wrote:

Can you really believe the government? Can you really believe all the “spook agencies” in any government. They thrive on disinformation.

Jun 15, 2013 10:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
chekovmerlin wrote:

If the “spooks” think that we will believe them, they have to double their IQ to be half-wits.

Jun 15, 2013 11:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JoeSchmoe123 wrote:

How do we know if there’s some secret law saying this is the official story?

Jun 15, 2013 11:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

A 2007 DOJ Audit found that the FBI had requested over 142,000 National Security Letters in just 2003-2005. If you extrapolate that rate out over 10 years there could be over 450,000 NSL’s requested in the last 10 years. Now, when the NSA is on over-drive to convince us all is well, we’re asked to believe that only 300 phone numbers have been scrutinized… I’m sorry.. but that just doesn’t pass the smell test…

Jun 15, 2013 12:10am EDT  --  Report as abuse
BiteRight wrote:

Very soon, this government will thoroughly search every house in our community just to track down a wanted criminal. Irritating, but no kidding.

Jun 15, 2013 12:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
simian wrote:

sounds like a huge waste of resources.

Jun 16, 2013 2:14am EDT  --  Report as abuse
rusty3b wrote:

AT&T this year won’t let me upgrade phones on my 10 year old family cell-phone plan. I am told that I need to come to an office with 2 forms of ID to clear the issue. There’s been no previous issue with the account and it appeared to be in good-standing. I can only think that SOME review of the account produced a need to acquire more identifying info for my account details. The account information collected is primarily collected before instantiation of the Patriot-Act. I wonder who reviewed the account? AT&T or the NSA?

Jun 16, 2013 2:51am EDT  --  Report as abuse
newsmedia wrote:

And this information is no doubt as reliable as that which claimed Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.
Hmmm…

Jun 16, 2013 5:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
LuJr75 wrote:

..and we’re supposed to believe that, right?

Jun 16, 2013 9:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
LuJr75 wrote:

If you believe that, I have a bridge to sell you.

Jun 16, 2013 9:03am EDT  --  Report as abuse

I smell more rats, more lies.

There is no truth in any politicians words. Even speaking correctly (grammatically correct? Sic Blumberg ‘Learn to Speak Grammar’ is a lost art.

Neologisms abound: optionality? Me and my? Depends on the definition of the word “is”

I have a Hawaiian Birth Certificate?

Jun 16, 2013 9:12am EDT  --  Report as abuse
AZreb wrote:

And is this another one of the “least untruthful” statements from the NSA?

The government says “Trust us” – but how can you trust if you can’t verify?

Jun 16, 2013 9:15am EDT  --  Report as abuse
VultureTX wrote:

And just how much data did “non” US officials aka Snowden, MI5,Mossad look at?

Jun 16, 2013 9:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Isaguy wrote:

The rest of the phone calls were scrutinized, just not closely…

Jun 16, 2013 9:31am EDT  --  Report as abuse
ldenton wrote:

What a load of garbage! Would it not just be simpler to track those we know have a propensity for terrorism, like immigrants from places like Afghanistan? But no, we wouldn’t want to be politically incorrect, now would we? It’s stupid and it’s dangerous. The Boston Marathon bombings prove that. Every single terrorist plot since 9/11 has been linked directly to people of the Middle East who want to kill us. In order not to “offend” Muslims, we have wasted billions and billions of dollars and taken away the 4th Amendment rights of all Americans. You liberals are destroying the greatest country the world has ever seen. I hope you know that.

Jun 16, 2013 9:38am EDT  --  Report as abuse
chinadaze wrote:

Gee, how comforting… What they declined to mention is that all of our phone conversations are being recorded and collected. They’ve only gone back and listened to 300 of them… so far. The rest can listened to later.

Jun 16, 2013 9:49am EDT  --  Report as abuse
nose2066 wrote:

There is a huge difference between collecting information and knowing what to do with that information.

For example, the Russians warned U.S. government agencies about the Boston bomber suspects well before that bombing – and what was the result???

Jun 16, 2013 10:05am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Dave2009 wrote:

There is merit to ferreting out the terrorist but the misuse of the tool to go after you political opposition is crux of this issue.

No one party can have exclusive rights on the power. Each has to have an equal role in the activity with oversight to ensure that these abuses do not take place.

How that can happen without costing a fortune and jeopardizing security is anyone’s guess.

Jun 16, 2013 10:18am EDT  --  Report as abuse
burn wrote:

The NSA is lying…parse their words few than 300 “numbers”, when they only have to watch ten numbers, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0…..to include everybody

Jun 16, 2013 10:24am EDT  --  Report as abuse
trugby wrote:

Since Clapper, Alexander, and Holder are proven liars, I find little reason to believe this doled out jibberish. Government appears to be flailing and hoping something comes along to distract public attention.

Jun 16, 2013 10:47am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Honeydog wrote:

The key word here is “closely.” Only 300 are watched closely or a lot. But how many are others are listened to? After all, the NSA said all they need to do to listen to a call is have an analyst decide they want to.

Jun 16, 2013 11:44am EDT  --  Report as abuse
JoeKiplinger wrote:

Yet very few believes the NSA spy information from regular Americans. Everyday we hear different spin. Americans no longer trust the information provided from the government. This is becoming like the former Soviet block system.

Jun 16, 2013 11:46am EDT  --  Report as abuse
WallaBingBang wrote:

Lies and misdirection.

Jun 16, 2013 11:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
DisinfoAbound wrote:

Says fewer than 300 phone numbers closely scrutinized

Needs $2,000,000,000 datacenter for domestic spying

Jun 16, 2013 12:11pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
sjfella wrote:

They now claim they stopped 20 terror attacks by their spying methods. I posted a comment several days ago predicting this type of story was right around the corner and it would be complete bs. It came even quicker than I thought. Now lets see how many sheep buy it as they toss another freedom down the drain.

Jun 16, 2013 12:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
GreaseMonkey wrote:

300 numbers of political opponents, or terrorists; this administration can not be trusted to use it power honorable and constitutionally, they simply can not be trusted to do what is right.

Jun 16, 2013 12:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ChiBlackhawk wrote:

Define “Closely”.

Jun 16, 2013 2:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
chicadee wrote:

2 The first angel went and poured out his bowl on the land, and ugly, festering sores broke out on the people who had the mark of the beast and worshiped its image.

Jun 16, 2013 2:24pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
chicadee wrote:

Rev 6:14 and 6:15

14And the heaven departed as a scroll when it is rolled together; and every mountain and island were moved out of their places. 15And the kings of the earth, and the great men, and the rich men, and the chief captains, and the mighty men, and every slave, and every free man, hid themselves in the dens and in the rocks of the mountains; 16And said to the mountains and rocks, Fall on us, and hide us from the face of him that sits on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb:

Jun 16, 2013 2:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
pbgd wrote:

This whole thing is just another red herring like Assange, fordder for the sensationalist media. Everybody knows that the CIA is keeping surveillance of suspicious, possible terrorist activities, and of course it must. That is not something that should bother you and me.

Like it or not, the internet never was a safe medium. – If you have a secret, write it on paper and keep it in your safe. If you have no safe, keep it under your mattress where Mr. Snowden can’t find it.

Jun 16, 2013 3:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:

Yes, it was/is if not why did they lie about it until they got caught? And why did he lie about knowledge of it until now? He is still lying about it. Under the United States Constitution our privacy was violated and he will not just own up to it. That is why he has to go.

Jun 16, 2013 3:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wackyweazle wrote:

Dear NSA/Obama,(I know that you are reading this)do you REALLY think that all your spins about having prevented terrorist attacks is fooling anyone?????When will you politicians learn;we all now know,if we only suspected it before,that you are all MONUMENTAL LIARS!!You are using terrorism to justify it.Edward Snowden is a Whistleblower not a traitor.You are more angry over the fact you got caught lying…again….

Jun 16, 2013 3:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cordstreet wrote:

Yeah. I don’t believe a word these pricks in Washington say anymore.

Jun 16, 2013 3:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cordstreet wrote:

Yeah. I don’t believe a word these pricks in Washington say anymore.

Jun 16, 2013 3:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:

From the Judge:

http://video.foxnews.com/v/2481952462001/opening-statement-the-government-cant-be-trusted/?playlist_id=1621774019001

Jun 16, 2013 3:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fr0thing wrote:

Obama lied – privacy died.

Jun 16, 2013 3:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
omallj wrote:

This information can be stored for a long time, so future governments can use it as a weapon upon the American people. I want to be protected by the government, but I don’t want them spying on me and my family. This is a Constitutional violation and I agree with the UCLA lawsuit. Also, why have the USA borders not been fully protected since 9/11? If the government is really interested in protecting US citizens against terrorists, that level of protection would have been established by now. I don’t think the government is interested in protecting the American people, I think the government is trying to protect itself from the American people, and from what we can do and protest as United States Citizens. Put your brain back on “cruise mode” because there is no one standing behind the curtain.

Jun 16, 2013 3:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
omallj wrote:

The Democrats and Republicans are all the same liars, so do not contribute to their campaigns anymore. We need another political party that does not lie to the American People.

Jun 16, 2013 3:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
angelgood wrote:

Are You Surprised???

Jun 16, 2013 3:49pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
angelgood wrote:

I didn’t vote for this ? Man.

Jun 16, 2013 4:00pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MudCow wrote:

This is even worse than Watergate that cost Nixon’s presidency. None of these arrogant snobbish officials intends to apologise nor step down for ill deeds. America is ruled by mafia.

Jun 16, 2013 4:10pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Donnatello wrote:

This has nothing to do with Obama other than the fact that he is complicit with it, just like about every other US president. Bush was all for it as well. This has nothing to do with one administration or the other. It has everything to do with our NSA and CIA, which exist outside of any elected official. If you don’t think this collection of this information is a problem, because “if you don’t do anything wrong, you have nothing to hide”, what happens when they decide that something you did is wrong, or can be used as leverage to gain information from you. Just look at how the CIA operates. They want information from a Swiss banker in a country which is a friend to the US. Well they just go in, get him drunk and then have the local authorities arrest him. They then come riding in to help him out, thus turning him toward their cause. Just wonderful how we operate in the world.

Jun 16, 2013 4:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
BuffaloGirl wrote:

We don’t believe your ridiculous comment that you (NSA) are collecting information that does not identify individual callers. What would be the point? Lies, Lies, and more lies! The president takes an oath to uphold the constitution. Lies, lies and more lies. As technology has increased the government’s ability to confiscate our information, the constitution has become more and more meaningless. This did not start with this administration. But this certainly takes the cake.

Jun 16, 2013 4:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
kaceltd wrote:

Of unintended consequences:-

1) The Army Corps of Engineers lay a grid canal system to drain the Everglades. Result: Aquifer and species loss, no protection against hurricanes and the net result — return the swamp to its natural state.

2) Satellite TV would be advertisment free. In fact, it is now a pleasure to look at WGN / WTBS.

2) Visa and Mastercard card programs were more secure than Fort Knox. Now, you are advised to carry a metal wallet to avoid data theft.

3) The Bush administration, invaded IRAQ and now provide the Chinese with an economical and US military guaranteed supply of oil. The same China that shields North Korea and dumps subsidised retail goods into the USA. Of course, Mr. Cheney believes that Snowden is a Chinese spy. Go figure….

4) PRISM will morph into the likes of “Minority Report”. In the meantime, ALL of the metadata, will be polled and then some criminal organisation will have your (anywhere in the free world) entire life history, your community, and your city. Then they can manipulate the system — a la “The Italian Job”.

We must have faith in the inherent goodness of people, otherwise we’ll become like Nazi Germany. In the end, that ideology failed.

And finally, despite being a soap opera society, Hillary Clinton’s first ever ‘TWEET’, didn’t upstage this ongoing NSA saga. Oh, by the way, did you notice that FBI Director Mueller has disavowed knowledge of the IRS’s targeting of Conservatives!! And this guy is in “intelligence”…..

Jun 16, 2013 4:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:

BTW this is the same COS that knew about the IRS targeting people and groups for their beliefs but did not tell obama…you bet. He was also in on changing the talking points for Benghazi and did not tell obama about that either…you bet. This is also the same COS that knew holder had given assault weapons to the mexican cartels and did not tell obama about that…you bet. And this is the same COS that knew holder had signed an avadavat against Rosen without P. cause and did not tell obama about that…you bet. Personally, if that is the case and I had a COS that kept me in the dark like that he would not be COS. But he did tell obama and they are all lying. That makes more sense.

Jun 16, 2013 4:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SanPa wrote:

I believe what Obama thinks is true … but what if Romney had won the election? or what if Cheney returned to office? Or Heaven frobid, Hillary?

I don’t think that it matters what President Obama feels it true. It is more to the point that we need to trust that the system will not lead to future failures with any person in the White House.

Jun 16, 2013 4:38pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
docroc wrote:

Fine – then send him and his predecessor — along with Cheney and other enemies of civil liberties — to the Court in the Hague.

Jun 16, 2013 4:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
docroc wrote:

Fine – then send him and his predecessor — along with Cheney and other enemies of civil liberties — to the Court in the Hague.

Jun 16, 2013 4:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
docroc wrote:

Fine – then send him and his predecessor — along with Cheney and other enemies of civil liberties — to the Court in the Hague.

Jun 16, 2013 4:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MudCow wrote:

Donnatello, this has nothing to do with Obama ??

He is the guy who should bear responsibility for poor leadership in his administration, turning a blind eye to all these nasty full scale tapping and surveillance on Americans. If a kid shoplifts, you mean it has nothing to do with his parents who give family teaching ?

Jun 16, 2013 4:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Lowell_Thinks wrote:

Mr. President,
Next year, you will see just how the electorate “feels” about this. Bye bye lame duck.

Jun 16, 2013 4:46pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Lowell_Thinks wrote:

omallj wrote:
“The Democrats and Republicans are all the same liars, so do not contribute to their campaigns anymore. We need another political party that does not lie to the American People.”

It’s called the Tea Party, come join us now fellow patriot.

Jun 16, 2013 4:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bitwdlr wrote:

No one is asking how many they viewed and noted to get to the 300 that were closely examined. From comments in local coffee shops, many are afraid to speak their mind for fear of government reprisals. With those attitudes, so much for democratic form of government. Only good thing to come of this is coffee shop business will go up as people discuss topics there that they won’t discuss on-line.

Jun 16, 2013 5:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:

Context: obama is hiding behind a war on terror that a week ago (or so) he said did not exist.

Jun 16, 2013 5:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
percy1 wrote:

totherepublic: Obama did not say any such thing. Please provide a quote. If you’re referring to his speech to the National Defense University, he specifically talked about stuff like this:

“Thwarting homegrown plots presents particular challenges in part because of our proud commitment to civil liberties for all who call America home. That’s why, in the years to come, we will have to keep working hard to strike the appropriate balance between our need for security and preserving those freedoms that make us who we are. That means reviewing the authorities of law enforcement, so we can intercept new types of communication, but also build in privacy protections to prevent abuse.”

Jun 16, 2013 5:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
elsewhere wrote:

Of course the President doesn’t feel that way. He like using private information to supress votes and voters who oppose him. By the way, don’t trust democrats to craft a bill that will truly protect the law abiding citizens personal information. They have a history of lying.

Jun 16, 2013 5:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ronb28135 wrote:

Obama is a proven liar and so is his chief of staff. Obama knows that once the NSA spying complex in Utah is operating that the next to final touch before declaring himself king is in place. Then there is only one more thing to do — GET OUR GUNS!!

Where’s Sheriff Joe when he’s needed?

Jun 16, 2013 5:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
UliWetlos wrote:

Obama:
“let me be perfectly clear, we are not violating anyone’s rights … as long as they don’t try to get in my way.”

Jun 16, 2013 5:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
candes wrote:

Well it looks like Obama lied again. This article is already outdated. Earlier today, the NSA admitted to having thousands of analysts listen to your phone calls without a warrant. They also read emails and text messages. This is not a joke! This is why pur representatives were so upset after the briefing!

Jun 16, 2013 5:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Assur wrote:

May he get a healthy dose of cancer.

Jun 16, 2013 5:56pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
notfooled2 wrote:

B0 can do no wrong, just ask him.

Jun 16, 2013 6:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fred5407 wrote:

To each and every commentor. These are the people you elected. This is Chicago Machine Politics at its finest. I think the guy who said it was a descendant of Al Capone.

Jun 16, 2013 6:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fred5407 wrote:

To each and every commentor. These are the people you elected. This is Chicago Machine Politics at its finest. I think the guy who said it was a descendant of Al Capone.

Jun 16, 2013 6:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Speaker2 wrote:

Well I feel my privacy is affected. I am starting to think the only “Change” we got was a new person, carrying out Bush’s presidentially policies on domestic spying, foreign p[olicy and war. That’s not change, just more dumb policy.

Jun 16, 2013 6:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JimPell wrote:

Golly, only 300 American citizens persecuted by this intrusion on their private lives? I probably don’t know any of them, so I’ll just write them off as collateral damage, and continue to trust my government to protect our constitutional rights.

Jun 16, 2013 6:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ModernLife00 wrote:

What? Its not a violation of Privacy? I don’t believe this!!! Can we ask what is the definition of Privacy then?

I have always seen surveillance done on enemies not on your own people. The government should try to find out other ways to achieve the same purpose. Anyhow hundreds of countries in the world control crimes by some other means not necessarily by developing a surveillance system.

Jun 16, 2013 6:20pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
candes wrote:

I don’t know why you didn’t allow my post to go through. It was the truth and is what was revealed at the secret briefing that our representatives attended. It is already on one news site, so it’s not like we are revealing classified info.

Yes they are reading your emails and text messages. And yes they a listening to your phone calls. They have thousands of analysts doing this!

Jun 16, 2013 6:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
candes wrote:

Oh and all of the above mentioned is done without a warrant. They dont hire thousands to listen to 300 peoples phone calls. Sheez… When will this lying stop?

Jun 16, 2013 7:00pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MrAndre76 wrote:

Really, so why do I feel like I live in a police state. The NSA is logging all of my phone calls and internet contacts in case I do something wrong in the future or in case federal or state authorities want to build a case against me. This is not democracy, this like living in the old Soviet Union. Oh and let’s see, the federal government can detain (arrest) me without charge and send me to an undisclosed location without due process if they “suspect” I may be involved in or support (what ever that means) a terrorist organization. I no longer have a right to face or question my accuser. Travel by public conveyance (plane, train, bus, boat) is no longer unrestricted. Short of being able to own almost any weapon I want, or having to house military troops, the Bill of Rights is pretty much destroyed. So tell me again how my/your privacy is not violated.

Jun 16, 2013 7:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Valorie wrote:

Of course he wouldn’t it doesn’t concern him.

Jun 16, 2013 7:21pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
roughman wrote:

Oh, thank GOD!!!

The simpering buffoon obama says it’s all good!

Jun 16, 2013 7:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
DriverEight wrote:

The good thing is that this is a much more efficient way to collect information about gun owners than a simple gun registry. Now with metadata they know you, your friends and their gps co-ordinates. Luckily George Bush had foresight.

Jun 16, 2013 7:33pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
MicahStone wrote:

Spy agency says fewer than 300 phone numbers closely scrutinized…

..isn’t that just about the TOTAL number of Republicans in congress?

Jun 16, 2013 7:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
LokifishMarz wrote:

This is coming from an administration that funds/arms the FSA, which has members of Al-Qaeda and other terrorist organizations in their ranks, and we are supposed to trust them?

Jun 16, 2013 7:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
edgyinchina wrote:

Obama wants congress to accept some responsibility, and only a handful even attend the meeting to be briefed on this…. go figure… The current sad state of our government… and WHY? Because we the people have allowed it to happen. We elected these clowns (both parties).
America needs a good leader in this time of trial and crisis… and she/he is nowhere in sight.
These are the times that try men’s souls.

Jun 16, 2013 7:43pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
lifeatford wrote:

I think it is time to dismantle the N.S.A. and move on, there are too many government employees now. The Government could remove 800,000 and their would still be too many working there.

Jun 16, 2013 7:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bloozguy wrote:

“The president is saying I want every member of Congress, on whose authority we are running this program, to understand it…”
So who is going to explain it to the President?

Jun 16, 2013 7:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
BobStreb wrote:

The Maoist occupying the White House has no concern whatsoever for violating Americans’ privacy. That fact has become self evident.

Jun 16, 2013 8:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ineeditbad wrote:

They Admit It! They Hid this from US…Yeah USa…Freedom Lost…

Jun 16, 2013 8:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ronryegadfly wrote:

Mr. President may not think he’s violated the public’s privacy but there can be no question that he’s violated our trust. This is a dark road to go down and our government had best wise up before it’s too late.

Jun 16, 2013 8:35pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TheNewWorld wrote:

@Speaker2

“Well I feel my privacy is affected. I am starting to think the only “Change” we got was a new person, carrying out Bush’s presidentially policies on domestic spying, foreign p[olicy and war. That’s not change, just more dumb policy.”

I started thinking that the second Obama made a request to Iraq to keep troops there beyond the GW Bush timeline for removal. Then he made a big ordeal of ending the Iraq war. It ended despite him, on GW Bush’s timeline, not because of him. Presidents change, foreign policy does not. The last President that bucked the military industrial complex had his blame splattered all over his wife and car.

Jun 16, 2013 9:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
forzapista wrote:

Such BS. Every politician is coming out now and saying it’s not violating anyone’s privacy or rights. What else would they say? They all voted for it and knew about it. They CAN’T say it’s illegal or a privacy invasion. They were all hoping we’d never find any proof of it.

Jun 16, 2013 9:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
jvonrock wrote:

Or that he’s spending huge amounts on his addiction. Denial will kill us all

Jun 16, 2013 9:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wilhelm wrote:

oh, OK…

Jun 16, 2013 10:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
gkIII wrote:

I really hope those 300 weren’t SPARTANs….

Jun 16, 2013 10:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NCMAN64 wrote:

The powers that be don’t give a ratsass about trampling the Fourth Amendment. We have two major parties in Congress lording over the populace, and most give us reason to want term limits. I guess we really cannot trust anyone in government

Jun 16, 2013 10:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
wootendw wrote:

No problem. Just get a search warrant supported by oath from the judicial branch. And stick to security threats – not political opinions.

Jun 16, 2013 10:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
NCMAN64 wrote:

It’s really unbelievable that the powers that be from both parties, are trampling our Fourth Amendment in the name of national security. Now you know why we need term limits.

Jun 16, 2013 10:56pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
WJL wrote:

300? Ha! Ha! Ha!

Jun 16, 2013 11:06pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
byrond2 wrote:

The NSA should have to listen to IRS workers ALL DAY AND ALL NIGHT LONG to make sure they don’t waste money. And THEN they should spy all Tea Party members and try they best not to PUKE. Barf bags cost $50 EXTRA. EACH.

Jun 16, 2013 11:13pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

So a former constitutional lawyer is stating there is no violation of 4rth amendment rights because that right was taken away by the patriot act and the false flag of 911. This country is quickly turning into a fascist police state and the POTUS is leading the way.
God help the children. infowars.com

Jun 16, 2013 11:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Mineyas wrote:

There so full of it. You want to be serious about protecting Americans, end the Patriot act, restore our 4th amendment,and we could have easily prevented 9/11. We didn’t even try to intercept the jets, because it was all part of the plan. Building 7 never even hit and collapses in a free fall. 9/11 is a conspiracy and our Government sucks!Only blind fools can’t see it!

Jun 16, 2013 11:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
craigVietnam wrote:

I agree with the President. This is not a violation of our freedom. I’m the first person to bemoan the loss of liberty for the sake of security. I don’t like the security we go through at the airport! The converstions were not listened to without wiretap authority. Representative government had oversight of the program. Let’s track every radical Muslim down and shoot him like the dog that he is.

Jun 16, 2013 12:12am EDT  --  Report as abuse
freddykruger wrote:

if obama and the government think it ok to be spied on then why are they making such a big deal about someone revealing what their doing. obama and the government particularly the NSA are a bunch of lying hypocrites. the surveillance is not suppose to be done to everyone, but only those found to have ties to terrorist! this program is illegal in its present form and they know that. it is suppose to be a case by case situation where the warrant with a fisa court. this is why they keep it in the shadows. not because of some lying secrecy. they have too much secrecy now! they using it to spy on anyone that might try to compete with the government. to get inside information of financial investments. they were already caught at this! making millions with knowledge for insider trading and illegal using it to infringe on the public’s privacy rights!

Jun 16, 2013 12:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
EXR wrote:

Why would the president think that this spying activity is illegal, when it fits so nicely into his personal agenda for this country: His socialistic, rather “Atlas Shrugged,” government control of of America. It seems that the president regards the Constitution as merely a historical document of no particular value in determining the rights of American citizens or the way they are to be governed; therefore violating our rights to privacy become a ‘privilege, rather than a right, that the government extends at their discretion.

Jun 17, 2013 1:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
EXR wrote:

Why would the president think that this spying activity is illegal, when it fits so nicely into his personal agenda for this country: His socialistic, rather “Atlas Shrugged,” government control of of America. It seems that the president regards the Constitution as merely a historical document of no particular value in determining the rights of American citizens or the way they are to be governed; therefore violating our rights to privacy become a ‘privilege, rather than a right, that the government extends at their discretion.

Jun 17, 2013 1:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
tomb8569 wrote:

He sure made sure HIS privacy was going to be protected before the sun set on his first in office though didn’t he.

Jun 17, 2013 4:41am EDT  --  Report as abuse
m1234567890 wrote:

Why do I think that Mr Obama is being an epic hypocrite?

Oh yeah, he railed against this sort of thing while a Senator and, aside from his press releases has spent millions sealing essentially all the records of his life.

God but I liked Senator and candidate Obama far more than President Obama.

Jun 17, 2013 6:30am EDT  --  Report as abuse
BertR wrote:

If it’s only this few of phone’s being illegally spied on, then that means they can easily get warrents as the law requires and go by the guidelines set forth by the Constitution.
If not, there is a legal process for them to make there illegal activity legal. It’s called an admendment and can be passed by 60% of the house and senate, then ratified by 3/4ths of the states.

Otherwise continuing what they are doing after being exposed is kind of like an attack on our our Constitution’s 4th admendment, the highest law of the land.
If it’s only a few hundred, I’m all for spying on them, just get a warrent and do it legally, as its been done for decades. We have special judges on call 24/7 for emergencies that can issue these immediatly, so time and speed is not a factor that hasnt already been accounted for

Jun 17, 2013 7:27am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Whiteathame wrote:

Obama does not feel Americans’ privacy violated!!!!

I guess we all need to go with Obama’s “feelings” ’cause he says so and … we can’t recall a president. I’m sure he feels the program didn’t violate Chinese privacy either

Jun 17, 2013 8:00am EDT  --  Report as abuse
jaham wrote:

The only problem is that he thought quite differently on the subject when GWB was in office.

“we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals.”

Suddenly, that false choice becomes legitimate once he is POTUS: “I think it’s important to recognize that you can’t have 100 percent security, and also then have 100 percent privacy and zero inconvenience. We’re going to have to make some choices as a society.”

Who knew GWB would be granted 16 years in office if only he was black….

Jun 17, 2013 8:24am EDT  --  Report as abuse
commenter1223 wrote:

He said Obama “welcomes a public debate on this question because he does say and he will say in the days ahead that we have to find the right balance, and we will not keep ourselves on a perpetual war footing.”

Obama would not have welcomed public debate as as Senator. He would have eviscerated the person or agency responsible. And as to the perpetual war footing, if he does not believe that we will stay in that mode, why did he nominate Stephanie Powers as UN representative. She has a history of wanting to go to war everywhere, just to protect someone’s “human rights”.

Jun 17, 2013 8:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
RealityMan wrote:

The most astonishing thing about all this is that the president, congress, court justices and bureaucrats and intelligence community members themselves are all assuming that NSA data will never be used against *them.* Maybe they think they’re all just too magic for that, or that the little people can be threatened enough to keep quiet.

Obviously, threats didn’t work for Snowden, and won’t work for anyone who can be bribed and or blackmailed, which is, quite frankly, everyone. China, Saudi Arabia and Goldman Sachs have deep pockets, and are not averse to threats either. There are no perfect safeguards that can be put in place that can’t be overcome by one or two people in the right places.

This system that monitors John Q. Citizen can monitor John Q. Supreme court justice. Everyone is at risk here. Everyone.

Jun 17, 2013 11:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Don_in_Odessa wrote:

It has been very clear for quite some time that what Obama “feels” is not neccessarily congruent with the actual facts.

Jun 18, 2013 5:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Don_in_Odessa wrote:

To prove the point, Mr Obama in 2007: “No more spying on citizens who are not suspected of a crime” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAQlsS9diBs&feature=player_embedded

Jun 18, 2013 6:07am EDT  --  Report as abuse
KDupre wrote:

Of course the president doesn’t think this is a problem. He LIKES knowing what everyone is doing especially those whose opinions differ from his. That way he can continue to target them through government organizations.

Jun 18, 2013 9:01am EDT  --  Report as abuse
ertdfg wrote:

“The president is not saying ‘trust me.’ The president is saying I want every member of Congress, on whose authority we are running this program, to understand it, to be briefed about it, and to be comfortable with it,” he said.

So he wants the NSA to STOP lying to Congress about this program NOW? Really? And that’ll be good enough?

My Senator had a letter to the NSA:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/seanlawson/2013/06/06/did-intelligence-officials-lie-to-congress-about-nsa-domestic-spying/

“…only persons reasonably believed to be located outside the United States are targeted and to prevent the intentional acquisition of any communications as to which the sender and all intended recipients are known to be located in the United States.”

Which we know is a lie, they collect all metadata, see Verizon.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper… lied to Congress:
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2013/06/fire_dni_james_clapper_he_lied_to_congress_about_nsa_surveillance.html

‘Back at an open congressional hearing on March 12, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) asked Clapper, “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper replied, “No sir … not wittingly.”’

And NSA Director Keith Alexander… also lied to Congress:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/06/06/watch-top-u-s-intelligence-officials-repeatedly-deny-nsa-spying-on-americans-over-the-last-year-videos/

Maybe if they’d simply quit lying to congress repeatedly (which is perjury after all) we’d already know about this “transparent” program.

Since when is perjury and lying about something the same as “transparency”? Are we sure Obama knows what that word means?

Jun 18, 2013 2:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ertdfg wrote:

“The president is not saying ‘trust me.’ The president is saying I want every member of Congress, on whose authority we are running this program, to understand it, to be briefed about it, and to be comfortable with it,” he said.

So he wants the NSA to STOP lying to Congress about this program NOW? Really? And that’ll be good enough?

My Senator had a letter to the NSA:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/seanlawson/2013/06/06/did-intelligence-officials-lie-to-congress-about-nsa-domestic-spying/

“…only persons reasonably believed to be located outside the United States are targeted and to prevent the intentional acquisition of any communications as to which the sender and all intended recipients are known to be located in the United States.”

Which we know is a lie, they collect all metadata, see Verizon.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper… lied to Congress:
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2013/06/fire_dni_james_clapper_he_lied_to_congress_about_nsa_surveillance.html

‘Back at an open congressional hearing on March 12, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) asked Clapper, “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper replied, “No sir … not wittingly.”’

And NSA Director Keith Alexander… also lied to Congress:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/06/06/watch-top-u-s-intelligence-officials-repeatedly-deny-nsa-spying-on-americans-over-the-last-year-videos/

Maybe if they’d simply quit lying to congress repeatedly (which is perjury after all) we’d already know about this “transparent” program.

Since when is perjury and lying about something the same as “transparency”? Are we sure Obama knows what that word means?

Jun 18, 2013 2:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ertdfg wrote:

“The president is not saying ‘trust me.’ The president is saying I want every member of Congress, on whose authority we are running this program, to understand it, to be briefed about it, and to be comfortable with it,” he said.

So he wants the NSA to STOP lying to Congress about this program NOW? Really? And that’ll be good enough?

My Senator had a letter to the NSA:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/seanlawson/2013/06/06/did-intelligence-officials-lie-to-congress-about-nsa-domestic-spying/

“…only persons reasonably believed to be located outside the United States are targeted and to prevent the intentional acquisition of any communications as to which the sender and all intended recipients are known to be located in the United States.”

Which we know is a lie, they collect all metadata, see Verizon.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper… lied to Congress:
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2013/06/fire_dni_james_clapper_he_lied_to_congress_about_nsa_surveillance.html

‘Back at an open congressional hearing on March 12, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) asked Clapper, “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?” Clapper replied, “No sir … not wittingly.”’

And NSA Director Keith Alexander… also lied to Congress:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/06/06/watch-top-u-s-intelligence-officials-repeatedly-deny-nsa-spying-on-americans-over-the-last-year-videos/

Maybe if they’d simply quit lying to congress repeatedly (which is perjury after all) we’d already know about this “transparent” program.

Since when is perjury and lying about something the same as “transparency”? Are we sure Obama knows what that word means?

Jun 18, 2013 2:35pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
pyanitsa wrote:

If Obama doesn’t feel that our privacy has been violated, why doesn’t he publish HIS mobile phone call records each month? To which numbers, from which numbers, frequencies and durations. That will make interesting reading. He can rest assured we will not violate his privacy.

Jun 19, 2013 1:02am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:

300 they are SUPPOSED to monitor.
How many actually intruded, using official hardware and software, while nobody is watching? Who knows.

Certainly, there is negative effort in suppressing any of those inappropriately monitored.

That’s because there is NO plan of checking on it. They WANT to be unable to check on it, so that they can say “nothing” inappropriate was done.

Jun 19, 2013 7:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
templeknight wrote:

If you believe these liars, you’ll believe anything. That being said,
I have ocean front property for sale on the moon.

Jun 21, 2013 3:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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