Hackers convention ask government to stay away over Snowden

Comments (26)

To be clear, Jeff Moss is only “uninviting” US Direct Hire Civil Service people.
Contractors who work for the government, like Ed Snowden – and Jeff Moss – are still welcome.

Jul 11, 2013 10:35am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Eideard wrote:

So the coppers will return to playing “undercover”.

Jul 11, 2013 10:40am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jameson4Lunch wrote:

Alexander willfully perjured himself in front of congress without consequence a few weeks ago. What exactly do his statements add to the article? He has no credibility.

Jul 11, 2013 11:18am EDT  --  Report as abuse
mb56 wrote:

I don’t blame them – when NSA General Alexander gave a talk at last year’s convention, he CLEARLY mislead them. He proclaimed that the NSA’s focus was on foreign intelligence only and that they were not collection “Dossiers” on average Americans. Just more lies from these people. General Alexander’s talk last year is available in it’s entirety on Youtube – go listen to his misrepresentations….

Jul 11, 2013 12:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlkalineState wrote:

Uncomfortable? You’re hackers. At a convention. You have a booth which is called “How to commit wire fraud and make it look like your neighbor did it.”

Jul 11, 2013 12:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Cesaredwns wrote:

ed that the NSA’s focus was on foreign intelligence only and that they were not collection “Dossiers” on avera

Jul 11, 2013 12:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
cbj wrote:

If a government agency does it, it’s despicable and deplorable regardless that the intent is to protect the nation as a whole and when a ‘hacker’ does it, it’s courageous and heroic regardless that it is done for personal gain, aggrandizement or simple Schadenfreude.

Sure, nothing absurd about that.

Jul 11, 2013 12:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

Because hackers only want to take money from the gov; but they won’t admit that they’re actually working to defeat traitors like Snowden

Jul 11, 2013 12:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
HadEnoughNow wrote:

They are right to keep the government out of this. The government has done enough snooping on American citizens. Tell Congress and the House of reps how you feel about all of this.

Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s office: 202-225-2815

Jul 11, 2013 1:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
BC5000 wrote:

By uninviting the Feds, it indicates how critical it is that they should attend.
Or by announcing this invitation to-not-attend, does it make one seam more appealing those who practice illegal activity?
Or how, by asking, will stop them from attending?

Jul 11, 2013 1:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
justinoinroma wrote:

they’re one in the same…

Jul 11, 2013 1:28pm EDT  --  Report as abuse

Hackers are people. If the Obama Administration offered them big money to secretly betray their fellow hackers and ordinary Americans, most hackers would grin and hold out their hands to catch the gold coins. Hackers would betray their mothers for money if the amount was large enough.

Jul 11, 2013 4:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bum_Thrower wrote:

I can’t blame them; ‘We’re from the government and we’re here to ‘snoop dog and spy on YOU’…..I wouldn’t trust them any farther than I could throw Chris Christi

Jul 11, 2013 6:19pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
SKYDRIFTER wrote:

The key topic for this year’s convention should center on personal countermeasures against the NSA, et al. If so, that should be quite interesting.

The American reality is that the ‘terrorists’ which the American public is conditioned to fear don’t use the Internet in any way which ‘regular’ users do. I’m not particularly savvy on “Spy vs. Spy” matters, but I know that the “bad guys,” such as the drug cartels and “terrorists,” use a variety of ‘security measures’ almost amounting to an alternate ‘net.

One such method is a program (if that’s the correct term) called “TOR” (or, “Tor”); among other means. I’m also told that the “terrorists” also use various security programs, relying upon 256 bit data encryption programs and “identity stripping” Internet services, such as “Virtual Private Networks” (VPMs). No doubt, the available list of Internet ‘security’ measures is huge – and growing. All that, before ‘traditional’ coding is employed. Such ‘personal’ countermeasures do require a lot of computing power, but the technology (and services) are cheap enough.

At least in theory, by the time that the NSA (for all its computing power) can ‘crack’ most of the ‘juicy’ data, it’s not very useful.

By any account, the ‘real’ secret to this “government spying” is that only non-terrorists are the factual targets of such programs as “Prism;” including the ‘loyal’ American public. BUT, prior to the “Snowden scandal,” what reasonably intelligent and rational American seriously believed that they had any ‘privacy,’ at all; especially on the Internet?

Enter the very interesting question as to why Edward Snowden didn’t ‘secretly’ leak his “information.” Eliminating the ‘obviously impossible,’ the most likely answer is that he’s a “Manchurian Patsy.” His “disclosures” have now forced the American ‘legal system’ to formally ‘legalize’ the “Big Brother” persona. The operative term being “formally.”

However, the “legality” aspect is probably not the goal of the matter; the real goal is far more likely to make ‘spying’ convenient, easy and almost totally unaccountable. Among other matters, the “legalization” will remove the risk of political embarrassment. Come election time, that’s vital. If a “Snowden” had appeared before last year; Obama would have been instant toast.

In all likelihood/probability, the “true secret” is that with the (highly predictable) American public’s ‘acceptance’ of such sophisticated (and protected) ‘government’ spying; there is no possible way to ascertain that any “acclaimed” data is at all factual. Who would suspect any pepper to be in the beach sand; let alone be able to sort it out? Just the legal costs would be prohibitive. (If one sees fit to be “bad;” it’s a great plan.)

It’s all a matter of perception control; or as Orwell so eloquently stated: “He who controls the past controls the future, and he who controls the present controls the past”. Alas, poor George; he was such an optimist. His intended warning became a blueprint.

In the words of Lord Acton, “Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Absent a popular cyber-rebellion, can there be any possible doubt as to what the future holds for America?

When the obvious legal dust settles, living the American “good life” will ‘constructively’ be uniquely at the whim of the ‘government’ – subject to change without notice. Speaking from harsh personal experience; that has been true for a long time. We’re now witnessing the “finishing touches.”

So, what is any individual American citizen to do with this hacking and spying? Communication and ‘data’ security begins with keeping one’s mouth shut. However, human nature being what it is, what personal countermeasures are available to the American public? Here’s hoping that this conference will address the means to restore “privacy” whether the ‘government likes it or not. Who is more qualified to design a secure lock than a burglar? Possibly, this conference may produce a new “American” crusade.

Jul 11, 2013 7:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
azjustin wrote:

“The Department of Homeland Security and FBI declined comment. Pentagon officials could not be reached”

I think this about sums up our entire gov’t.

Jul 11, 2013 7:26pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dd606 wrote:

If this isn’t the pot calling the kettle black, I don’t know what is. What a joke. Most of these losers would be working for NSA themselves, if they could pull it off.

The government can’t win. When they try to be friendly, everybody hates them and treats them like they’re the devil himself. Then when they don’t get involved, everybody says they’re up to something.

It amazes me how many people in the public seem to think that their lives are so interesting, that the government would waste 5 seconds monitoring them. Considering that half the population practically tweets every time they poop, I have no idea why they would care, even if it was true… Which it is not.

Jul 11, 2013 9:41pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
milestocode wrote:

Does this mean no “I spotted the Fed” tshirts this year? =(

Jul 11, 2013 9:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fr0thing wrote:

Hypocrites and sell-outs. These so-called “hackers” are chomping at the bit to work for the NSA to spy on us all. Trust no one.

Jul 11, 2013 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fr0thing wrote:

Hypocrites and sell-outs. These so-called “hackers” are chomping at the bit to work for the NSA to spy on us all. Trust no one.

Jul 11, 2013 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fr0thing wrote:

Hypocrites and sell-outs. These so-called “hackers” are chomping at the bit to work for the NSA to spy on us all. Trust no one.

Jul 11, 2013 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fr0thing wrote:

Hypocrites and sell-outs. These so-called “hackers” are chomping at the bit to work for the NSA to spy on us all. Trust no one.

Jul 11, 2013 10:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
lcky9 wrote:

AHHH guess the hackers didn’t know IF YOU LAY DOWN WITH DOGS YOU GET UP WITH FLEA’S… Well maybe they will pick their friends more carefully in the future..

Jul 11, 2013 10:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
timwhite98 wrote:

“Pentagon officials could not be reached”

Anyone else see the irony in this??

And in case the “goons” had missed me elsewhere, Snowden isn’t the problem. The Surveillance State is the problem!

Jul 11, 2013 11:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AaronTT wrote:

I kind of laugh at this article. The real spies at this convention are the ones you would least likely suspect, probably Jeff Moss, and others who “play the game”. The best cannot be spotted, and do a great job by playing key roles, often leading the charge AGAINST the NSA, CIA and so forth, while secretly working for them. They are very clever, and work by being exactly what you would least likely suspect, while making sure a couple of the ‘real’ guys are ‘caught’. Hehe..If I was a hacker who did not work for the gov., this is one place I would not be stupid enough to attend.

Jul 11, 2013 12:00am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Silmaril wrote:

It’s time to start again with a brand new country.
In a literary sense, the place John Galt went.
Let’s create that place.

John Galt Take Me With You . com

Jul 12, 2013 1:34am EDT  --  Report as abuse
cbj wrote:

SKYDRIFTER,
Hardly, The key topic for this year’s convention should center on personal countermeasures against hackers. That is to say how to stop DoS attacks by hackers themselves who seem to experience some sort of orgasmic joy akin to pyromaniacs starting a fire and watching it burn.
That such antics are not only condoned but supported and used by such loose organizations like LulzSec, Anonymous et al is of more a threat than any NSA program could ever hope to be.
Such antics cost millions of dollars not just in lost revenue but in the higher cost of goods and services that business must charge in order to fund the attempts to secure themselves from such acts of business terror.

Jul 12, 2013 11:53am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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